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Terms used:

Event

The name given to a group of skaters entered in a category.  There may be one event per category or several events per category depending on the number of total entries.  Each event is independent of the other events within the category. 

Fall

Defined as a loss of control by a skater with the result that the majority of his/her own body weight is on the ice being supported by any other part of the body other than the blades. e.g. hand(s), knee(s), back, buttock(s) or any part of the arm.

International Skating Union

The International Skating Union (ISU) is the exclusive international sport federation recognized by the International Olympic Committee administering the sports of Figure Skating and Speed Skating throughout the world. The ISU is composed of a number of national associations called ISU Members that administer ISU sports at the national level and recognize that all international matters are under the sole jurisdiction and control of the ISU.

Interruption

The time elapsed between the moment a skater stops performing the program until the moment the skater resumes performing the program.

Interruptions

The time elapsed between the moment a skater stops performing the program until the moment the skater resumes performing the program.

Judges

An individual sixteen years of age or older who has been trained and appointed to officiate at or below a specified level of competition in one or more of singles, pairs, ice dance or synchronized skating.

Referee

A referee of an event within a competition is an experienced judge who has received further training to conduct an event and monitor the performance of the panel of judges. Referees are qualified to referee or judge at or below a specified level of competition in one or more of singles, pairs, ice dance or synchronized skating.

Referees

A referee of an event within a competition is an experienced judge who has received further training to conduct an event and monitor the performance of the panel of judges. Referees are qualified to referee or judge at or below a specified level of competition in one or more of singles, pairs, ice dance or synchronized skating.

Technical Controller

An individual sixteen years of age or older who is responsible for accurate technical panel process and authorizes, corrects, deletes and adds elements to the list of elements performed during an event. Technical controllers are qualified to act on panels at or below a specified level of competition in one or more of singles, pairs, ice dance or synchronized skating.

The purpose of this procedure is to provide referees, judges, skaters and coaches with information they can use when situations arise that cause an interruption or stoppage during a skater/team’s performance.

Instructions to Referees Re: Allowance of delayed start or restart

Skate Canada referees are expected to familiarize themselves with ISU Special Regulations & Technical Rules - Allowance of delayed start or restart (Rule 515 – Single & Pair Skating and Ice DanceRule 965 – Synchronized Skating), as well as the Skate Canada rules for Competitions and Scoring of Skate Canada Competitions regarding the application of interruption deductions.

With respect to the practical applications of these rules, please note the information below:

  1. An interruption is defined as the time elapsed between the moment a skater stops performing the program until the moment he resumes performing the program. For every interruption of more than ten (10) seconds, there shall be a deduction (See Scoring of Skate Canada Competitions > deductions for details).
  2. A fall in and of itself should not be considered an interruption. There are times however that following a fall, a skater may be injured and therefore after the fall they are showing no attempt to perform. In this situation the referee should begin timing for a possible interruption deduction.
  3. At any time in Skate Canada competitions (qualifying and non-qualifying) if the referee feels there is a possible head injury or concern of concussion or if advised by medical, they should blow the whistle or stop the music to signal to the skater(s) to stop skating. The referee will allow a break of up to three minutes for the skater(s) to be assessed. In all domestic competition, if the skater is able to continue no deduction will be applied.
  4. At competitions where video replay is available, a referee may use video replay to verify the length of an interruption in a questionable situation.
  5. At competitions where video replay is not in use, the referee should time and apply interruption deductions based on their best judgment and understanding of the rules. In this situation, referees are reminded to give the benefit of any doubt to the skater in a questionable situation.
  6. At competitions where a volunteer timer is assigned to a panel, the referee should request that they time the length of the program beginning with the first movement of the skater. They should not stop this timing unless instructed to do so by the referee. In this situation, the referee should have a separate stopwatch ready to time the length of any interruptions.
  7. At competitions where there is no volunteer timer assigned to a panel, the referee should have two stopwatches. One stopwatch can be used to time the length of the program beginning with the movement of the skater.The second stopwatch can be ready to time the length of any interruptions.
  8. The referee should have a discussion with the music technicians and video replay operators (if applicable) prior to each event. They should be instructed that they are not to stop the music or the video recording unless directed to do so by the referee. In some situations, a music technician or video replay operator may see a skater hurt and stop the music or video without consulting the referee. Referees should explain the deduction situation and outline the importance of waiting for instructions before stopping the music or video. 
  9. For junior and senior singles, in case of up to 3 minutes Interruption, the referee should inform the technical controller where the interruption began as it relates to the application of the halfway factor to jumps

We appreciate the efforts of all of our referees in applying these deductions with their best judgment. Skate Canada will continue to communicate any further clarifications as they become available.

Examples

Situation

Skater/Team

Referee

Deduction

The music skips or stops playing during the performance

Stops skating & approaches the Referee

Stops the music (if still playing) & addresses the music problem. Once resolved, instructs skater to restart from the point of interruption.

If this happens in the first 30 seconds of the program, the skater(s) may choose to restart from the beginning and all elements are marked again.

If the music keeps skipping and the skater does not stop, the Referee may decide to stop the music and resolve the problem.

No deduction. Music problems are not considered the fault of the skater.

The wrong music is played

Approaches the Referee

If the music technician does not have the correct music, the Referee will instruct the skater(s) to produce the proper music. If there is difficulty in locating the proper music, Referees should avoid unduly delaying the competition. The Referee may elect to have the skater moved to the end of the flight so as not to further delay the next skater. If the skater is last in the flight or the final competitor, the Referee will resolve the problem as quickly as possible.

No deduction. Music problems are not considered the fault of the skater.

Faulty music file or CD that will not play

Approaches the Referee

If all attempts to resolve the issue have failed, the Referee offers the skater(s) the option to skate to another piece of music or withdraw. (Skaters MUST skate to music and should seek permission to use another skater’s music). As in the previous scenario, efforts will be made to avoid

unduly delaying the competition.

No deduction. Music problems are not considered the fault of the skater.

There is an adverse condition that arises (i.e. arena problem, power outage, something is thrown onto the ice)

Stops skating on signal of the Referee and approaches the Referee

Signals the skater(s) to stop skating, stops the music and addresses the adverse condition. Once the situation is resolved, instructs the skater(s) to restart from the point of interruption. If 10 minutes elapses due to the adverse condition, the skater(s) and any remaining skater(s) in the group will be given an additional warm-up period.

Regardless of how much time has elapsed, the skater with the interruption will restart their program from the point of interruption.

 No deduction. Adverse conditions unrelated to the skater are not considered the fault of the skater.
A skater/team has an equipment issue (i.e. untied lace/bootstrap), forgets their program, or becomes injured/ experiences health problems (except head injury/concussion – see below).  

Skater(s) may attempt to resolve the situation or injury and continue the program without approaching the Referee.

At any time if the Referee feels there is a health or safety concern, they may blow the whistle to signal to the skater(s) to stop skating and resolve the situation

 

The music keeps playing. The skaters have up to 40 seconds to resume skating. The Referee will time the length of the interruption from the point when the skater(s) stops skating to the point when they pick up the program.

The Referee may stop the performance for health and/or safety concerns but the music will continue to play until the skater(s) indicates they are requesting a 3-minute break.

If the Referee stops the skater(s), the skater(s) still have the choice of attempting to resolve the situation and continue skating, or requesting a 3-minute break

 

An interruption deduction is applied depending on the length of the interruption:

See Scoring of Skate Canada Competitions > deductions for details
A skater/team has an equipment issue (i.e. untied lace/bootstrap), forgets their program or becomes injured/ experiences health problems and determines they are unable to resolve the problem or injury within 40 seconds Skater(s) approaches the referee and indicates they are requesting a 3-minute break.  

The music is stopped. The Referee will allow a break of up to 3 minutes. Within this time allowance, the skater/team must pick up the program from the point of interruption. If this skater(s) does not resume skating within the additional 3 minutes, they are considered withdrawn.

There is only one 3-minute break permitted per program.

The 3-minute break is timed from the moment the skater(s) reports to the Referee.

 

A deduction for the 3- minute break is applied:

See Scoring of Skate Canada Competitions > deductions for details

A skater/team sustains a possible head injury or concussion At any time if the Referee feels there is a possible head injury or concern of concussion, or if advised by medical they should blow the whistle or stop the music to signal to the skater(s) to stop skating to be assessed.  

If the Referee stops the skater(s), the music is stopped and the Referee will allow a break of up to three (3) minutes for the Skater(s) to be assessed.

Within this time allowance, the skater/team must pick up the program from the point of interruption. If this skater(s) does not resume skating within the 3 minutes, they are considered withdrawn. There is only one 3-minute break permitted per program.

The 3-minute break is timed from the moment the skater(s) reports to the Referee.

This will also apply to Synchronized Skating teams. Teams will be permitted to insert their alternate skater (if available) and resume the program from the point of interruption within the three (3) minute break.

No deduction in domestic competition
A skater/team has a 38 second interruption followed by a request for a 3-minute break. After they resume skating, they have another 15 second interruption.

Attempts to resolve two issues without approaching the Referee.

Approaches the Referee once to request a 3-minute break.

The Referee allows the music to continue playing during the first interruption while the skater(s) attempts to resolve the situation.

The Referee stops the music when the skater requests/signals for a 3-minute break.

The Referee will time any further interruptions and apply the appropriate deductions.

The Referee allows the music to continue playing during the second interruption while the skater(s) attempts to resolve the situation.

 

The Referee applies the initial deduction for the 38 second interruption. Once the skater(s) request the 3-minute break, the Referee applies the corresponding deduction. This deduction cancels out the previous interruption deduction. Additional deductions for interruptions that occur when the program has been restarted after the 3- minute break may be applied.

The Referee applies an interruption deduction for 15 seconds.

Total deduction in this scenario is for a 3- minute break plus a 15 second interruption.

Withdrawals

Skate Canada expects Referees to use an auditory signal to let skaters/teams know when they are approaching the end of their 40 second or 3-minute time allowances.

Situation

Decision

A skater/team has a problem related to themselves or their equipment (i.e. damage/injury) and is unable to continue skating or resolve the problem and does not

report to the Referee within 40 seconds

The skater/team is considered to be withdrawn.

A skater/team is given a 3-minute period to address an equipment issue or injury and is unable to continue skating within the 3-minute period.

The skater/team is considered to be withdrawn.

A skater/team is given a 3-minute period and resumes skating, and has a second situation that arises causing them to stop performing the program.

If the skater resolves this second situation within 40 seconds without the music stopping, a subsequent interruption deduction is added to the 3-minute break deduction.  The skater/team is not considered to be withdrawn.

A skater/team is given a 3-minute period and resumes skating, and has a second situation that arises causing them to stop skating and approach the Referee to request an additional 3-minute break.

The 3-minute period is only granted once. The skater/team still have the option to try and resolve the situation within 40 seconds. If this is not possible the skater/team is considered to be withdrawn.