Terms used:

Axis

Refers to the imaginary line(s) which divide the ice surface (e.g. Long Axis, Short Axis)

Basic Position

Refers to the three basic spin positions – camel, sit and upright.

Basic Positions

Refers to the three basic spin positions – camel, sit and upright.

Beat

A note defining the regular recurring divisions of a piece of music.

Bracket

A turn executed on one foot from an outside edge to an inside edge or an inside edge to an outside edge, with the exit curve continuing on the same lobe as the entry curve. The skater turns in the direction opposite to the curve.

Brackets

A turn executed on one foot from an outside edge to an inside edge or an inside edge to an outside edge, with the exit curve continuing on the same lobe as the entry curve. The skater turns in the direction opposite to the curve.

Camel Position

Singles and Pairs: A basic spin position with the free leg backwards with the knee higher than the hip level, however Layback and Biellmann are still considered as upright positions.

Ice Dance: Performed on one foot with skating leg straight or slightly bent and body bent forward and free leg extended or bent upward on a horizontal line or higher.

Change Foot Spin

A spin that has a change(s) of foot and a minimum of three revolutions on each foot.

Change of Edge

The visible tracing of a skate on one foot that changes from one curve and edge to another curve and edge.

Chassé

A series of two edges (usually outside, inside) in which on the second edge the free foot is placed on the ice beside the skating foot, but not ahead of or behind it, and the free foot is lifted with the blade parallel to the ice.

Closed Mohawk

A mohawk in which the instep of the free foot is held at the heel of the skating foot until the free foot is placed on the ice behind the heel of the skating foot. Following the weight transfer, the immediate position of the new free foot is in front of the new skating foot (e.g. steps 11 and 12 of the Rocker Foxtrot).

Combination Spin

A combination spin has different definitions depending on the discipline as follows:

  • Singles: A spin which includes a change of position. A combination spin must include a minimum of two different basic positions with two revolutions in each of these positions anywhere within the spin. To receive full value, a spin combination must include all three basic positions. The number of revolutions in positions that are non-basic is counted in the total number of revolutions. Changing to a non-basic position is not considered a change of position. When a change of foot is required, the change of foot may be executed in the form of a step over or a jump. The change of foot and the change of position may be made either at the same time or separately.
  • Pairs:
  • Ice Dance: A dance spin which has a change of foot performed simultaneously by both partners.
  • Synchronized Skating: The spin combination must include a minimum of two different basic positions (sit, camel, upright or any variation thereof) and only one change of foot. The change of foot and the change of position must occur at the same time by all skaters executing the spin.

Continuous Axis

An imaginary line running around the ice surface that serves as a basis for a dance pattern. Usually the continuous axis consists of two lines running parallel to the long axis of the ice surface, approximately halfway between the long axis and the perimeter of the rink. These lines are joined at each end of the ice surface by a semi-circle. These semi-circles are flattened in some dances so that they run parallel to the ends of the ice surface. In circular dances, such as the Kilian, the continuous axis approximates a circle. The continuous axis of the Paso Doble is an oval.

Counter

A turn executed on one foot from an outside edge to an outside edge or an inside edge to an inside edge, with the exit curve on a different lobe from the entry curve. The skater turns in the direction opposite to the entry curve (i.e. in the direction of the exit curve).

Counter Rotation

In the air, the body rotates in the direction opposite to the way it does on the take-off edge.

Cross Roll

A roll started with the action of the free foot approaching the skating foot from the side so as to strike the ice almost at right-angles to the skating foot, started forward with the feet crossed in front or backward with the feet crossed behind. The impetus is gained from the outside edge of the skating foot as it becomes the new skating foot. In this case, the change of lean to the curve in the opposite direction creates a “rolling movement”.

Crossover

A step or sequence of steps (push + cross) in which the free foot crosses the skating foot completely before it is placed on the ice.

Cumulative Points Calculation

The Cumulative Points Calculation Judging System is a method for the calculation of results in the sport of figure skating. This system is based on the principle that a performance can be divided into elements (of difficulty) and program components, each of which can be evaluated individually. The total of the marks for all of the elements and components forms the score for each skater or team in a competition. The highest scoring skater, couple or team is declared the winner.   The second highest places second and so on.

Dance Pattern

The pattern of any dance is the design of the dance on the ice.  The diagram of a pattern dance includes all the information needed to execute one complete pattern (sequence) of the dance.

Edge

May refer either to part of the skate blade, or the visible tracing of a skate blade on one foot that is on one curve. An edge may be either inside (towards the body) or outside (away from the body), and forward or backward, for a total for four different edges. A "deep edge" is a deep lean on the edge of the skate. Deep edges are rewarded, while skating on a "flat" (on both edges at the same time) is discouraged.

Edges

May refer either to part of the skate blade, or the visible tracing of a skate blade on one foot that is on one curve. An edge may be either inside (towards the body) or outside (away from the body), and forward or backward, for a total for four different edges. A "deep edge" is a deep lean on the edge of the skate. Deep edges are rewarded, while skating on a "flat" (on both edges at the same time) is discouraged.

Evaluators

An individual sixteen years of age or older who is responsible for assessing tests in the STARSkate program.  Evaluators are qualified to assess tests at or below a specified level (effective September 1, 2017 the lowest test level assessed by evaluators is Senior Bronze) in one or more of the STARSkate program disciplines.

Event

The name given to a group of skaters entered in a category.  There may be one event per category or several events per category depending on the number of total entries.  Each event is independent of the other events within the category. 

Events

The name given to a group of skaters entered in a category.  There may be one event per category or several events per category depending on the number of total entries.  Each event is independent of the other events within the category. 

Fall

Defined as a loss of control by a skater with the result that the majority of his/her own body weight is on the ice being supported by any other part of the body other than the blades. e.g. hand(s), knee(s), back, buttock(s) or any part of the arm.

Flying Spin

Novice and lower and STAR:

Spins that enter with a jump and land in a spinning position. The spin may have a change of foot or a change of position or both. Examples: flying sit spin (FSp), flying change sit spin (FCSSp), flying camel spin (FCSp), flying change camel spin (FCCSp), flying upright spin (FUSp), flying change upright spin (FCUSp), flying combination spin (FCoSp), flying change combination spin (FCCoSp).

ISU definitions for Junior and Senior:

Flying spin: A spin with a flying entrance with no change of foot or position.  The name of the flying spin corresponds to its landing position: flying sit spin (FSSP), flying camel spin (FCSp), flying upright spin (FUSp), flying layback spin (FLSp). This definition is very specific for junior and senior short programs.  

Spin with a flying entrance: This is the ISU definition for all flying spins that are not ‘flying spins’ as defined above.

 

Hand-in-hand Hold

Facing in same direction – The partners face in the same direction and are skating side by side or one behind the other with their arms extended and their hands clasped. A variation of this is the arm-in-arm side by side hold.

Facing in opposite directions – The partners usually face each other while one skates backward and the other skates forward with the arms extended to the side but sometimes the hold can be skated back to back (e.g. steps 22-25 in the Cha Cha Congelado).

Highlighting

A term used in synchronized skating when one skater performs a movement that is away from and in contrast with the rest of the team.

Ina Bauer

A two-footed movement in which the skater travels along the ice with one foot on a forward edge/tracing and the other on a matching backward edge on a different but parallel edge/tracing.

International Skating Union

The International Skating Union (ISU) is the exclusive international sport federation recognized by the International Olympic Committee administering the sports of Figure Skating and Speed Skating throughout the world. The ISU is composed of a number of national associations called ISU Members that administer ISU sports at the national level and recognize that all international matters are under the sole jurisdiction and control of the ISU.

Interruption

The time elapsed between the moment a skater stops performing the program until the moment the skater resumes performing the program. For every Interruption of more than ten (10) seconds, there will be a deduction. A stoppage resulting from a situation unrelated to the skater or that is not the fault of the skater will not result in a deduction.

Introductory Steps

In Ice Dance, all pattern dances (does not apply to Pattern Dance Elements in short dance) may be started with optional introductory steps.

Judge

An individual sixteen years of age or older who has been trained and appointed to officiate at or below a specified level of competition in one or more of singles, pairs, ice dance or synchronized skating.

Judges

An individual sixteen years of age or older who has been trained and appointed to officiate at or below a specified level of competition in one or more of singles, pairs, ice dance or synchronized skating.

Jump Combination

Singles and Pairs: Two or more jumps in which the landing foot of the first jump is the take-off foot of the next jump and so on. There is no change of foot or turn between the jumps, although the toe may be used to assist the take-off. One full revolution on the ice between the jumps (free foot can touch the ice, but no weight transfer) keeps the element within the definition of a jump combination.

Synchronized Skating: Any number of jumps of at least one revolution that may be linked with turns, steps or with a slight touch down.

Jump Combinations

Singles and Pairs: Two or more jumps in which the landing foot of the first jump is the take-off foot of the next jump and so on. There is no change of foot or turn between the jumps, although the toe may be used to assist the take-off. One full revolution on the ice between the jumps (free foot can touch the ice, but no weight transfer) keeps the element within the definition of a jump combination.

Synchronized Skating: Any number of jumps of at least one revolution that may be linked with turns, steps or with a slight touch down.

Jump Elements

An individual jump, a jump combination or a jump sequence. In some jumps, the toe of the free foot is used during the take-off phase. The number of rotations is based on the direction of travel of the take-off and landing edges. In ice dance a jump cannot be more than one revolution, and may be executed by only one partner at a time. This jump may be performed either in hold or separated.  Both partners may jump at the same time.

Jump Sequence

Singles and Pairs: May consist of any number of jumps of any number of revolutions that may be linked by non-listed jumps and/or hops immediately following each other while maintaining the jump rhythm (knee); there can be no turns/steps, crossovers or stroking during the sequence. Any hop inside the sequence requires that the skater visibly leaves the ice.

In a jump sequence an axel type jump can follow another jump providing the requirements above are present.  The movement to the take-off edge is not considered to be a step.  If an axel type jump immediately follows any other jump without any hops, mazurkas, and/or unlisted jumps, this will be considered   a jump sequence.  A listed jump followed by non-listed jumps is not considered a jump sequence but will count as a solo jump.

Synchronized Skating: Consists of any number of jumps of any number of revolutions that may be linked with small hops and dance jumps, immediately following each other while maintaining the jump rhythm (knee); there can be no crossovers or stroking between jumps during the sequence.

Kilian Hold

The partners face in the same direction with the lady to the right of the man and his right shoulder behind her left. The left arm of the lady is extended across the front of the man's body to hold his left hand. His right arm crosses behind the lady's back to clasp her right hand. Both right hands rest over her hip bone.

Lobe

A curve that is representative of a part of a circle. For example, edges and dance steps are done on lobes. In ice dance, a lobe is any sequence of steps on one side of the continuous axis that is approximately semi-circular in shape.

Lobes

A curve that is representative of a part of a circle. For example, edges and dance steps are done on lobes. In ice dance, a lobe is any sequence of steps on one side of the continuous axis that is approximately semi-circular in shape.

Loop

A one-foot movement where the skater skates an oval pattern using the same edge. The entry and exit of the loop must cross. The loop must be clean cut without scrapes or points

Mohawk

A turn from one foot to the other in which the entry and exit curves are continuous and of equal depth. The change of foot is from an outside edge to an outside edge or from and inside edge to an inside edge.

Mohawks

A turn from one foot to the other in which the entry and exit curves are continuous and of equal depth. The change of foot is from an outside edge to an outside edge or from and inside edge to an inside edge.

Non-listed Jumps

Jump that is not listed in the Scale of Values; does not count as a jump element.

Open Mohawk

A mohawk in which the heel of the free foot is placed on the ice at the inner side of the skating foot, the angle between the two feet being optional. Following the weight transfer, the immediate position of the new free foot is behind the heel of the new skating foot (e.g. the man's steps 8 and 9 and the lady's steps 12 and 13 in the Fourteenstep).

Pivot

A two-footed movement in which the toe picks of one foot are inserted into the ice by a skater as a central pivoting point while the other foot travels in a circular pattern around the pivot point.

Program Component

Program Components

Progressives

A step or sequence of steps in which the free foot passes the skating foot before is it placed on the ice, thereby bringing the new free foot off the ice trailing the new skating foot.

Reverse Kilian Hold

This position is similar to the Kilian position but with the lady at the man's left.

Rhythm

The regularly repeated pattern of accented and unaccented beats which gives the music its character.

Roll

A short or long, forward or backward edge.

Section

A part of a sequence of a pattern dance.

Segment

The name given to a portion of an event.  Some categories have two segments (e.g., short program and free program) and some categories have only one segment (e.g., Juvenile singles).

Sequence

The set order of the prescribed steps that compose one pattern (sequence) of a Pattern Dance.

Shadow Dance

The term used when a skater skates the full pattern of the dance with another skater, coach or PA using a “shadow” formation. The partners face in the same direction and are skating side by side with no more than one arm’s length distance between them.

Short Axis

A straight line that divides the ice surface into two halves crosswise (midline). On an ice surface that is 100’ x 85’, the short axis runs the width of the 85’ side through the middle of the ice.

Sit Position

Singles and Pairs: A basic spin position with the upper part of the skating leg at least parallel to the ice.

Ice Dance: A basic spin position performed on one foot with skating leg bent in a one-legged crouch position and free leg forward, to the side or back.

Solo Dance

The term used when a skater skates the full pattern of a dance by themselves.

Spin

In singles and pairs, a spin must have at least three revolutions to be considered a spin. The minimum number of revolutions in a position is two without interruption.  If this requirement is not fulfilled, the position is not counted. The change of foot in any spin must be preceded and followed by a spin position with at least three (3) revolutions. If one foot is lacking three revolutions in a basic position, the spin will receive less value. If the skater(s) falls when entering a spin, a spin or a spinning movement is allowed immediately after this fall (for filling time purpose) with this spin/movement not being counted as an element.

Spiral

A gliding position executed on one foot with free leg extended (including knee and foot) above hip level.

Spiral Sequence

A collection of at least two spirals executed on different feet, separated by no more than four steps (eight steps for STAR 2) not including the step taken into the skating foot of the second spiral.  (A step in this case applies to any time a change of foot takes place, e.g. Mohawk = 2 steps, 3-turn = 1 step, crosscut = 2 steps). Some categories have requirements for supported/unsupported and/or direction of spirals.

Spirals

A gliding position executed on one foot with free leg extended (including knee and foot) above hip level.

Spread Eagle

A curving, two-footed movement in which the skater skates with one foot on a forward edge and the other on a matching backward edge on the same curve (eg. outside and outside).

Step

The visible tracing on the ice that is executed on one foot. A step is counted each time there is a change of foot.

Styles

In ice dance, characteristics of levels of step sequences, organized as Styles, are technical requirements with ongoing validity and are published in an ISU Communication.

Swing Roll

A roll held for several beats of music during which, when skating backward, the free leg lifts and then first swings forward, then backward past the skating foot, then back beside to skate the next step. When skating forward, the free leg first swings backward, then forward and then back beside to skate the next step. The swing of the leg gives the sense of a “rolling movement”.

Technical Specialist

An individual sixteen years of age or older who identifies elements and levels of difficulty of elements in competition. The technical specialist will also identify falls and illegal elements. Technical specialists are qualified to act on panels at or below a specified level of competition in one or more of singles, pairs, ice dance or synchronized skating.

Tempo

The speed of the music in beats or measures per minute.

Toe Loop

Turn

A rotational movement in which the skater moves from forward to backward or backward to forward using one foot and on an edge and axis (e.g. Three-turn, Bracket). In a two-foot turn the rotational movement from forward to backward or backward to forward is from one foot to the other foot (e.g. Mohawk, Choctaw).

Upright Position

Singles and Pairs: Any spin position with the skating leg extended or slightly bent which is not a camel position.

Ice Dance: A basic spin position performed on one foot with skating leg straight or slightly bent and upper body upright (on a nearly vertical axis), arched back or bent to side

Contents[Hide]

STAR 1-5 Video Resource Library

The STAR 1-5 Video Resource library is now available here - STAR 1-5 Video Library

Please note: Some images in the Toolkit are currently unavailable and will be uploaded within the next few weeks.

Introduction

STAR 1 to 5 offers a solid development pathway for skaters who are entering a figure skating program for the first time. The complete STAR 1-5 Resource Tool Kit will offer coaches and clubs information to help deliver their program in a fun, enjoyable and challenging format.

 

This stage of development (Learn to Train), as described in our Skate Canada Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) document, states:

In the Learn to Train stage skaters are encouraged to acquire a skill set that will allow them to reach the highest level of proficiency that their unique talent and commitment will allow. It is defined by technical development rather than chronological age. There is a free skating bias at this stage as skills learned in freeskating will transfer easily to the other disciplines.

Technical development is the defining characteristic of this stage. All other development supports and accommodates technical development. Aptitude in other areas such as performance and mental training skills may be identified and should be introduced but should not replace skill acquisition. The volume of training in the Learn to Train stage may not be any greater than others but the range of skill acquired and personal growth attained is substantial.

General Objectives

  • To increase the commitment level of athletes to our sport as demonstrated through increased yet effective training time
  • To develop the language and rules of figure skating
  • To develop the ability to practice/train in different ways (i.e. private and group lessons, as well as independently)
  • To develop and consolidate basic sport specific skills while continuing to develop motor skills

(agility, balance, coordination, rhythm, time/space orientation, speed, dexterity) and control

of movement

  • To acquire and demonstrate a good understanding of the mechanics of jumping and spinning
  • To develop some understanding of artistic training, under the umbrella of technical training. Artistic knowledge is relative to the technical proficiency and age of skaters
  • To introduce conditioning, off-ice technical jumping skills and fundamental mental skills including concentration, self-motivation, visualization, relaxation, positive self-talk and goal setting
  • To create awareness and enthusiasm for the various testing and event opportunities available to athletes in Learn to Train
  • Introduce ancillary capacities (warm-up, hydration, cool-down, stretching, etc.)

STAR 1-5 Program

The STAR 1-5 program will introduce skaters to the sport of figure skating and its disciplines:

  • Freeskate, Skills, Dance and Synchronized Skating (optional)

All coaches teaching skaters at the STAR 1-5 level of development must be trained on the contents of this program.

As explained in the LTAD Philosophies, the importance of strong technical development is critical at this stage.

The STAR 1-5 Resource Tool Kit is designed to give coaches the tools and information to ensure programming and delivery formats cover the crucial areas necessary to build strong foundations for all skaters.

STAR 1-5 Philosophies

Golden Age of Learning

Section 1 – page 9 of the LTAD Model explains the “Windows of Trainability” athletes go through as they mature. In order to maximize the skater’s potential, coaches should be familiar with each of these windows. The Learn to Train stage generally hits two of these windows: Skill development (ages 8-12) and Flexibility (ages 6-10). The importance of training proper technique during this “golden age of learning” is paramount for optimum skill development. To take advantage of the flexibility window, coaches are encouraged to offer off-ice programming and promote the participation of other sports during this phase.

Remove Barriers for Progression

During this “golden age of learning” it is imperative that skaters are encouraged to move through the assessments at their own rate. Coaches and skaters no longer have to wait for test days or adjust their training plans to accommodate dates for testing as coaches will be assessing this program. Coaches can spend time on training, development and skill acquisition and assess the skaters when ready. For many clubs this will open up huge opportunities for growth and progression as acquiring officials on a regular basis is a difficult task (due to availability) and can be very costly in remote areas.

Strong Focus on Quality Basics

The STAR 1-5 program is designed to encourage skaters and coaches to strive for the highest quality of skill execution and acquisition. A strong foundation at this level will enable skaters to progress more quickly in the higher levels of figure skating and be ready for the next level of skills. This philosophy is reinforced by encouraging skaters to achieve the “Pass with Honours” designation on their assessments, as well as achieving “Gold” status on their performances at events.

Introduce More Complex Skills Earlier to Allow for a Better Foundation for Development

As in CanSkate, many skills in the STAR 1-5 program will be introduced early to allow coaches to work with skaters on developing these skills over time. Many skills in skating are complex. Introducing these skills early will enable coaches to hone and develop the skaters’ technique over time. This will allow the skaters to have sufficient practice of the skill before it is required in our sport. Be mindful that many of these skills are not expected to be performed at an advanced level, but rather at a level that is in development. It is critical that coaches are aware of each standard of the skills as they progress through the STAR program.

Create a Better Bridge from CanSkate to Figure Skating

The entry level of STAR 1 is designed to meet the exit level of Stage 6 in CanSkate. It is imperative that all skaters beginning STAR 1 have the skills of Stages 5 and 6 in CanSkate. STAR 1 Skills and STAR 1 Freeskate are designed to be achieved within three to nine months of exiting CanSkate. The remainder of the STAR 1-5 program is designed to assist the skater’s development in a progressive manner. Skaters may move through the STAR program at their own pace per discipline. For example: A skater may be working on STAR 3 Skills, STAR 1 Dance and STAR 2 Freeskate.

Why Coach Assessed Tests?

Assessment in the STAR 1 -5 program will be performed by the coach who is teaching the skater the discipline that is being assessed.  There are many reasons why coaches will be assessing their skaters:

-          Clears the pathway for development by removing time and logistic barriers. Skaters will have access to assessment opportunities as they are ready and their development progresses. Without the demands of readiness following a pre-set test day calendar, the skaters are free to move through the program at their own rate without obstacles. STAR 1-4 assessments are designed to be available to the skaters on their regular session and during their normal time slot, thus allowing the assessments to be convenient and free of additional ice or travel costs.

-          Opens up equal opportunity to all skaters regardless of location in Canada. Being able to use the club coach to perform assessments enables all skaters in every region of Canada to have the opportunity to be assessed when ready. This eliminates the geographical advantage or disadvantage due toavailability of officials. During the “Learn to Train” stage of development,  the ability to move through the program when ready is a critical component of maximizing skill progression in this “golden age of learning”.

-          Allows coaches to be 100% accountable for skater development. Coaches will have total command over skater development from CanSkate to double jumps. This opportunity is advantageous in ensuring skater development quality is consistently monitored, nurtured and encouraged.

-          Costs to the skater is reduced. The STAR 1-4 assessments can be taken at any time during the year on the session they are skating. STAR 5 assessments for the pattern dances and freeskate programs, must be skated on clear ice. This can be done on a session that has been cleared (Freeskate program or dance pattern), or can be scheduled on a separate session. 

For the level:

-          Every skater will go through early, moderate and advanced stages of development for each skill and area of technique. The STAR 1-5 program allows skaters to be rewarded for being on the pathway of development at each stage. A STAR 1 skater will be at the early stages of development in all areas, therefore the assessment standards will reflect an “early stage” performance. The new assessment standards will reflect a satisfactory or good performance “for the level” regardless of the stage of development.

 

Coaches will be given more information on assessments in the STAR 1-5 Assessor Training and STAR 1-5 Assessment Guide.

 


STAR 1- 5 Content Format

Colour Coded: Each discipline has been assigned a colour to assist in easy recognition of documents and reference.

Skills = Green                                        Freeskate = Purple                                  Dance = Blue

 

SKILLS

FREESKATE

DANCE

STAR 1

Edges, Turns, Field Move, Stroking

Elements

 

STAR 1: Elements

STAR 2

Edges, Turns

Elements

Program: STAR 2 Event requirements

STAR 2a: Dutch Waltz

STAR 2b: Canasta Tango

STAR 3

Field Move, Stroking

Elements

Program: STAR 3 Event requirements

STAR 3a: Baby Blues

STAR 3b: Elements

STAR 4

Edges, Turns

Elements

           

Program: STAR 4 Event requirements

STAR 4a: Swing Dance

STAR 4b: Fiesta Tango

 

STAR 5

Field Move, Stroking

Elements

Program: STAR 5 event requirements

STAR 5a: Willow Waltz
                   (M & F)

STAR 5b: Elements

 

5 assessments

5 assessments

4 assessments

9 assessments

 

Total of 23 assessments

(spanning LEARN TO TRAIN: Stage 6 to double jumps)

In all areas of development, skaters will be introduced to simple and then more difficult concepts throughout their progression. Many elements will be repeated to allow coaches to introduce technique, develop the technique and finally master the technique needed for solid development.

The next chart shows a list of all skating elements that are included in the STAR 1-5 Assessment pathway

Overview STAR 1-5 Test Content

 

SKILLS

FREESKATE

DANCE

 

Elements

Elements

Program

Elements/Pattern Dance

STAR 1

Fwd edges

Fwd 3-turns

FI-MoH turn sequence

STAR 1 stroking (basic)

Fwd spiral circles

Choice of Field Move:

(Fwd 1 ft sit glide, inside spread eagle or Ina Bauer)

Waltz jump

Single salchow

Single toe loop

Fwd upright spin

Bwd upright spin

No program

Fwd progressives

Fwd chasses

Fwd swing rolls

Fwd slide chasses

Fwd outside cross rolls

STAR 2

Bwd edges

Bwd 3 turns

Fwd circle on circle

2ft to 1 foot multi turns

FO turn sequence

Single salchow

Single loop

Single flip

Waltz/toe loop combo

Fwd sit spin

Change foot upright spin

Fwd camel spin

STAR 2 Program

STAR 2a: Dutch Waltz

STAR 2b: Canasta Tango

STAR 3

STAR 3 stroking (power)

Fwd spiral circles

Choice of Field Move:

(Bwd 1 ft sit glide, spread eagle, Y-spiral or Ina Bauer)

Single flip

Single lutz

Single loop/loop combination

Bwd upright spin

Bwd sit spin

Fwd camel/sit spin

STAR 3 Program

STAR 3a: Baby Blues

STAR 3b:

Bwd progressives

Bwd chasses

Bwd swing rolls

Fwd inside open mohawk

x-roll/x-behind

Fwd 3-turn/BO edge

STAR 4

Fwd brackets

Bwd brackets

Fwd double threes

Bwd circle on circle

Fwd change of edge

Single lutz jump

Single axel

Single flip/toe loop combo

Single loop/loop combo

Bwd camel spin

Change foot sit spin

Flying camel or sit spin

Fwd combination spin (change of foot optional)

STAR 4 Program

*MUST attempt axel                                

STAR 4a: Swing Dance

STAR 4b: Fiesta Tango

 

STAR 5

STAR 5 Stroking 1

 (quick edges)

STAR 5 Stroking 2

(bwd slalom)

 

Spiral Sequence

Single axel

Any double jump (2S – 2Lz)

Single lutz/Toe Loop combo

Spin in 1 position with any variation

Sit or camel spin (entry optional)

Combination spin (change of foot optional)

STAR 5 Program

*MUST land axel at < or better

STAR 5a: Willow Waltz

 (M & F)

STAR 5b:

LFO open Mohawk

Double knee bend

Fwd progressive/swing roll

Bwd progressive/swing roll

Tenfox progressive

LFO x-behind chasse

Bwd rolls

Fwd x-roll/3-turn

Fwd x-rolls


Main Focus of Each Discipline

Skills

The main focus in the STAR 1-5 Skills discipline will be the development of edge and turn technique using “figure form”. (Image to come)

- Narrow Stance

- Arms close to the body

- Free foot held close to skating leg

- Highlights balance point on blade

- Requires solid control fro balance, flow (strong core)

- focus on edge quality vs. presentation

Stroking exercises will also be introduced to enhance power and rhythm. Skaters will also be introduced to a variety of field moves to help develop balance, flexibility and strength.

Dance

The dance development at this level will focus on the execution and comprehension of dance technique with skaters learning the dance steps before the dance patterns. Skaters will be encouraged to master timing and pattern execution before introducing partnering technique by using “shadowing” for their assessments.

Shadow Dance

Shadow dance is the term used when a skater skates the full pattern of the dance with another skater, coach or PA using a “shadow” formation.

Freeskate

STAR 1-5 freeskate development will concentrate on jump and spin technique, along with the development of programs using program components as the focus.

The assessment criteria will follow the same guidelines as the criteria used in events at the STAR 1-5 level and higher to bring awareness to technical requirements of our sport.

Example: Basic Spin Position Definitions 

Terms & Definitions

Throughout this resource different terminology will be used to describe the various strategies and techniques coaches and clubs may use to deliver this program.  Below is a list of terms or definitions that may appear throughout the STAR 1-5 program.

STAR 1-5 Terms or Short Forms

General

Definition

Short Form

Definition

Short Form

Right Foot

R

Outside Edge

O

Left Foot

L

Inside Edge

I

Forward direction

F

Backward direction

B

Examples: RFO = Right forward outside edge, LBI = Left backward inside edge

Clockwise

CW

Counter-clockwise

CCW

 

DANSE

Progressive

Pr

Chassé

Ch

Slide Chasse

SlCh

Swing roll

SwR

Open Mohawk

OpMo

Closed Mohawk

ClMo

Cross

X

 

 

 

FREESKATE

 

Jumps

 

Spins

 

Waltz Jump

W

Forward Upright Spin

USp

Toe Loop

T

Backward Upright Spin

BUSp

Salchow

S

Sit Spin

SSp

Loop

Lo

Camel Spin

CSp

Flip

F

 

Combination Spin (no change of foot)

CoSp

Lutz

Lz

Change foot

C

Axel

A

Flying entry

F

Single

1

Spiral Sequence

SpSq

Double

2

Turn sequence

TrSq

Jump Combination

+C

 

 

 

Under-rotated (a jump lacking 1/2 to 1/4 rotation)

 

Examples:

CSSp = Change sit spin

FSSp = Flying sit spin

CCop = Change combo spin

 

 

 

Downgrade (a jump lacking more than 1/2 rotation)

<< 

Examples:

1T = Single toe loop

2Lo = Double loop

1F + 1Lo + C = Single Flip - Single loop combination

1A< = single axel, under rotated

1A<< = single axel, downgraded

   

 

Term

Definition

Pathway of development

Every skater will go through early, moderate and advance stages of development for each skill and area of technique.

Continuum of development

Term used to describe the various stages of development skaters will move through in the STAR 1-5 program

For the level

Term used to identify where the skater is performing based on the continuum of development

Clear Ice

Clear ice is a term used to describe a time period of ice time that does not have any skaters actively skating. This can be a session where the skaters have been asked to go to the boards for a short period of time, or a dedicated session that enables skaters to use the ice for assessments only.

Re-skate

The opportunity for the skater to perform an element a second time if the first attempt was unsuccessful.  The number of re-skates is dependent on the type and level of assessment.

STAR 1-5 Freeskate Elements = 2 re-skates

STAR 1, 2 and 4 Skills = 2 re-skates

STAR 3 and STAR 5 Skills = 1 re-skate

Re-skates can be taken directly after the unsuccessful attempt or at the end of the assessment.

Figure form

 

Figure form refers to a body alignment and posture carriage trained when skaters used to perform compulsory figures. This body alignment consists of a tall posture and narrow stance while standing on one foot. Arms are carried close to the body, at waist level. The free foot is carried in a quiet manner and will be held in the line of direction either in front or behind the skating foot (heel to toe or toe to heel). All movements are performed in a calm and controlled manner. Stability through the core of the body is essential.

The is no “one way” to perform skills in figure form. Coaches are able to use the technique that works for each skater while keeping within the principles above.

Skating side

The term “skating side” refers to the side of the body that is doing the skating. If the skater is gliding on their right foot, the right side of the body then becomes the “skating side”.

Skating foot refers to the foot that is doing the skating.

Skating leg refers to the leg that is doing the skating.

Skating arm refers to the arm of the side that is doing the skating.

Free side

The term “free side” refers to the side of the body that is NOT doing the skating. If the skater is gliding on their right foot, the left side of the body then becomes the “free side”.

Free foot refers to the foot that is not on the ice.

Free leg refers to the leg that is not on the ice.

Free arm refers to the arm of the side that is not doing the skating.

Axes on the ice surface

When referring to different axes on the ice surface, use the definitions below:

 

LONG AXIS: A straight line that divides the ice surface into two halves lengthwise (midline). On an ice surface that is 100’ x 85’, the long axis runs the length of the 100’ side through the middle of the ice.

 

SHORT AXIS: A straight line that divides the ice surface into two halves crosswise (midline). On an ice surface that is 100’ x 85’, the short axis runs the width of the 85’ side through the middle of the ice.

 

CONTINUOUS AXIS: An imaginary line running around the ice surface that serves as a basis for a dance pattern. Usually the continuous axis consists of two lines running parallel to the long axis of the ice surface, approximately halfway between the long axis and the perimeter of the rink. These lines are joined at each end of the ice surface by a semi-circle. These semi-circles are flattened in some dances so that they run parallel to the ends of the ice surface. In circular dances, such as the Kilian, the continuous axis approximates a circle. The continuous axis of the Paso Doble is an oval.

 

TRANSVERSE AXIS: An imaginary line intersecting the continuous axis of a dance at the right angles.

Rotating axis

This term refers to the axis the skater is rotating around either in the air or on the ice, drawing a line through the landing or spinning side of the skater. Most commonly, this term is used when describing the proper body position required for rotating efficiently in the air. 

Forward arrest motion

This term refers to the beginning of a spin from the spiraling entrance. The free side starts from behind the skating side and rotates forward as the skating side seems to stop thus creating an arrest motion to allow the free side to initiate the spin.

¼ mark (quarter mark)

This term refers to the ¼ mark on a circle.

Lobe

A lobe refers to a curve that is representative of a part of a circle. For example, edges and dance steps are done on lobes.

Class

A class is a group lesson environment that allows the coach to take direction of all or a large majority of the skaters using the entire ice or a designated area of ice. The class can be very structured or more open depending on the nature of the class.

 

A structured class is where the coach sets the direction and the exercises to be performed during the class duration. The coach will also provide the format in which the skaters are to practice the skills (ie: lanes, circuits, stations, etc)

 

An open class allows the coach to set the direction of the session and then allow the skaters to work on their own during that portion of the session, while the coach supervises and works with skaters individually for short periods of time (ensuring that everyone gets some attention). This is a good strategy to use when introducing the concept of individual practice, as it helps guide the skaters on the “how to practice” component of their training.

Group lesson

Group lessons describe a lesson format that allows a coach to teach 3 or more skaters at the same time. It is recommended to keep the number of skaters in a group lesson below 6 as the STAR program skills are technical in nature, therefore requiring more attention from the coach. Larger group lessons are permissible and may be optimal for different areas of focus that do not require as much technical focus.

Group lessons can be arranged by the private coach or by the club.

Individual practice

Individual practice is a term used to describe the ice time that the skater uses to develop their skills on their own.

Private or semi-private lesson

Private lessons are lessons arranged one on one between the coach and a skater. Semi-Private lessons are lessons arranged between the skater and the coach that includes 2 skaters in the same lesson.

Engaged supervised practice

This term describes practice ice that is being actively supervised, monitored and motivated by a coach. During engaged supervised practice, coaches can give feedback, corrections, ideas and motivation to the group of skaters on the ice. This strategy is an excellent tool to develop individual practice habits in the club.

Stations

Stations can be used to help guide the skater’s practice content on sessions. A station on the ice would contain a list of skills or areas that the coach would like the skater to practice during their session. Coaches can then determine how long the skaters have to work at each station. Skaters are encouraged to use the full ice when practicing and use the stations for guidance and skill identification. 

 

Stations may be used on a regular basis or on a special day.

 

Coaches can take advantage of stations in both a group lesson and private lesson formats to maximize the practice time for the skaters.

 

Circuit

A circuit is a pattern on the ice that includes progression, skills and other exercises for skill development. Circuits can cover any amount of ice, including the full ice. Circuits are a great way to increase the skater’s productivity, increase repetition and provide them with exercises to use when practicing on their own.

Lanes

 

 

 

Continuous Lanes

 

 

 

 

Highway Lanes

 

4 Lane Highway

 

3 Lane Highway

 

 

2 Lane Highway (Volcano)

 

 Perimeter Lanes

Lanes is a term used to describe a path for the skater to follow across the ice. Ex: “Skate in this lane”. The use of lanes allows many skaters to skate safely on the ice and be able to maintain their own space.

 

Continuous Lanes is a term used to describe a format that allows continuous movement of skaters while working on very specific skills. This pattern will start in one corner of the ice. The skaters will then be instructed to perform a skill or set of skills the length of the ice in the lane closest to the boards. Upon reaching the other end, skaters will then move over to the next lane and perform the next skill indicated in the lane immediately beside the original lane. This lane will be between the original land and the mid line of the ice surface. The last two lanes will then repeat this pattern on the other side of the ice, ending at the same end of the ice where the skaters started this exercise. Skaters then skate back to the start and either repeat or start a new set of skills.

The use of pylons to indicate the lanes on the ice is a good strategy for visual awareness.

Continuous lanes are a full ice circuit and as such, allow the coach to spend quality individual time with skaters while keeping the rest of the session moving. This is a great strategy to use when the coach would like to focus on technique or more complex skills.

 

Highway Lanes is a term used to describe a format that allows skaters to skate up the ice in one direction and return to the start of their line in a safe and controlled manner.

 

A 4 Lane Highway is a term used to describe a format that allows 4 lines of skaters to perform a variety of skills in unison (if possible) and push their development.  This pattern starts with 4 lines of skaters starting at one end of the ice. The 1st skater from each line will proceed at the same time, performing the skill indicated by the coach to the other end of the ice surface. Once at the other end, the 2 lanes on the left skate to the perimeter on the left side, and the 2 lanes of the right skate to the perimeter on the right side and continuing skating along the boards until they reach their line again. 

 

To create an environment to challenge skaters and bring unity to the class, encourage the skaters to stay with their group as they continue down the ice. This promotes timing, awareness and can challenge speed and edge quality.

 

If facilitating a class of different levels, each lane could have its own focus to accommodate the specific goal of each developmental group.

 

Sometimes pylons are appropriate for this session; however the majority of the uses tend to see pylons as a safety hazard.

 

The highway format is a good opportunity to develop power, speed and depth of curve. Coaches may also use this format to highlight presentation. Some arenas that are not very wide may find it more beneficial to use a 3 Lane Highway.

 

2 Lane Highway or Volcano allows two lines of skaters start at one end of the ice, travel down the length doing the prescribed exercise and then splitting apart at the opposite end to skate back to their lines along the boards. This is a great format for practicing skills that require more speed or depth of curve.

 

This format offers more space for power, speed and depth of curve than the 4 Lane Highway format.  A great option to push the skater’s limits and challenge development.

 

Perimeter Lanes use the ice around the perimeter of the rink, keeping the middle ice open for other uses (private lessons, freeskating, etc). Coaches may use one or two lanes along the side of the boards depending on the number of skaters in the class This is an excellent way to incorporate a class into a regular session.

Dance Holds

The below is a list of dance holds used in the compulsory dances.

Hand in Hand: (same direction) The partners face in the same direction and are skating side by side or one behind the other with their arms extended and their hands clasped.

Killian: The partners face in the same direction with the lady to the right of the man and his right shoulder behind her left. The left arm of the lady is extended across the front of the man's body to hold his left hand. His right arm crosses behind the lady's back to clasp her right hand. Both right hands rest over her hip bone.

 

Reverse Killian: This position is similar to the Kilian position but with the lady at the man's left side.

 

Waltz (Closed): The partners are directly opposite each other. One partner faces forward while the other partner faces backward. The man's right hand is placed firmly on his partner's back at the shoulder blade with the elbow raised and the arm bent sufficiently to hold the lady close to him. The left hand of the lady is placed on the shoulder of the man so that her arm rests comfortably, elbow to elbow, on his upper arm. The left arm of the man and the right arm of the lady are extended comfortably at shoulder height. Their shoulders remain parallel.

Foxtrot (Open): The hand and arm positions are similar to those of the closed or waltz position. The partners simply turn slightly away from each other so that they both skate in the same direction.

Pattern Dance

The term “pattern dance” is used to describe the compulsory dances in the Skate Canada curriculum. There are 2 types of pattern dances: set and optional.

 

Set Pattern Dance: A dance for which the location, direction and curvature of all edges to be skated are designated in the diagram. This diagram must be followed as closely as possible.

 

Optional Pattern Dance: A dance for which the pattern may be altered by the skaters provided that the original step sequences, positions and timing are maintained. Each repetition of the altered pattern must be executed in the same manner and the restart must be commenced from the same place.

Solo Dance

Solo dance is the term used when a skater skates the full pattern of a dance by themselves.

Shadow Dance

Shadow dance is the term used when a skater skates the full pattern of the dance with another skater, coach or PA using a “shadow“ formation.

Jump Sequence

A jump sequence may consist of any number of jumps of any number of revolutions which may be linked by non-listed jumps immediately following each other, while maintaining the jump rhythm (knee). There can be not more than two (2) three turns/Mohawks during the sequence; there can be no cross-overs or stroking during the sequence. A jump sequence, consisting of only one listed jump together with other non-listed jumps is not considered a jump-sequence but will count as a solo jump.

Jump Combination

A “jump combination” is a sequence of two or more jumps in which the landing edge of the first jump serves as the take-off edge for the second and so on. There is no change of foot or turn between the jumps, although the toe may be used to assist the take-off.

Basic Position

(Spins)

The term “Basic Position” is most commonly used to describe the 3 basic positions in spins. They are described by the ISU as follows:

 

Upright Position: any position with extended skating leg which is not a camel position

 

Sit Position: buttocks not higher than the knee of the skating leg

 

Camel Position: Free leg backwards with the knee higher than the hip level, however Layback and Biellmann are still considered as upright spins

 

It is very important to know the definitions of the basic positions as skaters will be assessed on their ability to demonstrate these positions in their spins.

Spin Classifications

Spins are classified and identified in many ways. Below are some clarifications.

 

Rotational Direction:  There are 2 main groups of spins according to the direction of rotation:

-          Forward entry spins: These spins generally enter with a FO spiralling edge on the opposite foot the skater lands on. The spin is initiated by a FO 3-turn creating a BI spinning edge.

-          Backward entry spins: These spins generally enter with a FI spiralling edge on the same foot the skater lands one. The spin in initiated by a FI 3-turn creating a BO spinning edge.

 

Flying Spins: Spins that enter with a jump and land in a spinning position.

Change foot spins: Spins that maintain the same position and change feet.

 

Combination spins: Spins that include a change of position regardless whether there is a change of foot or not.

 

NAME OF JUMP

TAKE-OFF

LANDING

 

EDGE

TOE

EDGE

One-Foot Axel Paulsen

LFO

no

LBI

Waltz

LFO

no

RBO

Axel Paulsen

LFO

no

RBO

Inside Axel Paulsen

RFI

no

 RBO

Loop (Rittberger)

RBO

no

RBO

Toe Loop

RBO

yes

RBO

Half Loop (Euler)

RBO

no

LBI

Salchow

LBI

no

RBO

One-Foot Salchow

LBI

no

LBI

Flip

LBI

yes

RBO

Lutz

LBO

yes

RBO


** Note that reverse jumpers (those that rotate CW in the air) will have the opposite take-off and landing foot.  For example, the take-off edge for a reverse jumper’s Waltz jump is a RFO and the landing edge would be a LBO. 

Planning

The STAR Program Delivery Team

 

Each Club will have a STAR program delivery team that consists of:

  • Coach(es)
  • Coordinator (may or may not be a coach)
  • Volunteer Member(s) to assist if necessary
  • Test Chair (to help ensure assessment records are filed accordingly)
  • Program Assistants (may also be used in this program under the direction of a coach).

 Duties:

Coordinator

              Coaches            

Program Assistants (PA’s)

Test Chair

Group skaters, provide tracking tools, info letters & assessment sheets when appropriate

 

Teach all technical skills according to delivery methods

To assist the coach where needed

(can be used for Shadow Dance)

Communicate with coaches to establish “assessment procedures”

 

Assess skaters

Design schedule that incorporates all areas of development

Provide demonstrations

 Communicate assessment procedures to parents

Schedule variety, challenge, fun and simulations days into program

Lead parts of the session

 Ensure all coaches assessing skaters are approved to do so

Prepare music as needed

 

 Fee collection

 

Lead parent information sessions

(must be a coach)

 

Educate/advise volunteers on skating matters

 

Ensure summary sheets are recorded appropriately

Ensure that all disciplines are taught on a weekly basis

 

 Ensure all assessment results are forwarded to Skate Canada

The STAR 1-5 Program Delivery Standards

STANDARD

Coordinator

Coach

PA

Test Chair

Ensure a minimum of one NCCP Primary (Regional Coach) trained Coach is on the ice at all times.

X

X

 

 

Program Assistants may be used as required.

 

X

X

 

Ensure coach directed time (group/class) follows the guidelines set out in this guide

X

X

 

 

Ensure group lessons and/or group classes are managed safely with appropriate coach ratio according to discipline, type of class or lesson

X

X

 

 

Ensure learning environment is motivating, challenging and welcoming

X

X

X

 

Ensure all skaters are offered instruction in all disciplines on a weekly basis

X

X

 

 

Ensure 90 % continuous movement for all sessions

X

X

 

 

Ensure all sessions have a set plan for warm up and cool down whether it be in class form or a private plan for the skater. This can be done on or off ice.

X

X

 

 

Ensure full ice surface is being used for the session and is available to the skaters in this program

X

X

 

 

Use teaching aids and/or learning technology to enhance the learning environment

 

X

 

 

Assess skaters on an “as needed” basis to ensure solid development that matches the rate of the skater’s learning

 

X

 

 

Ensure results of all assessments are filed in an appropriate and timely manner.

 

 

 

X

Communicate with parents on a regular basis to ensure understanding and delivery updates on progress and procedures

X

X

 

 

Provide incentives and rewards to enhance challenge/fun days and keep learning environment motivating

X

X

 

 

Provide variety in programming format to keep the sessions motivating, challenging and inspiring to meet the needs of the skater’s development

X

X

 

 

Establish an assessment procedure with coaches that outlines a clear process.

 

 

 

X


The STAR Program Delivery Format

Parts of a Session

Every STAR Session should begin with a warm up and conclude with a cool down. These parts of the sessions may be done on or off the ice. The middle of the session should contain the teaching and learning components. 

Warm up:

  • MUST include exercises that increase blood flow to the major muscle groups and increase the skater’s heart rate.

Examples:

ON ICE

OFF ICE

CLASS containing edge/power exercises. Upbeat with lots of knee action incorporated.

CLASS containing some aerobic exercises and dynamic stretching. Upbeat with lots of knee action incorporated.

Individual plans for each skater identifying proper warm up exercises appropriate for their level and development

Individual plans for each skater identifying proper warm up exercises appropriate for their level and development

Specific examples of warm up class content can be found here:

Specific examples of warm up class content can be found in:

STAR 1-5 On and Off Ice Strategies

Teaching and Learning:

  • MUST include periods of review and new skill acquisition or development. This “Learn to Train” stage of development requires a strong focus on “coach directed” time.  The strategies outlined in bold below are examples of “coach directed” time.

Examples:

Strategy

Description

Group lessons

Coach or club directed/organized. Ensure all disciplines are offered, (can be included in a hybrid model of group and private/semi-private lessons).

Private/semi-private lessons

 Coach directed. Can be used in conjunction with group lessons to ensure coverage in all disciplines and maximize coach-directed time.

Classes

Coach or club directed/organized. Classes direct skaters to focus on specific areas of development with coach supervision, instruction and guidance. Classes may be delivered in many different formats: Open class, structured class, lane work, etc.

Station Work

(coach directed or self directed)

Stations can be used to help direct the skater’s focus during practice time. Stations can be generic (Jump station, Spin station, Program station, etc) or more specific focuses (Example: Basic spins, Flying spins, Combo spins, Variation spins, etc.).

Engaged supervised practice

Coaches may use supervised practice to encourage, motivate and facilitate good practicing habits.

Self-directed practice with

training books

Coaches can provide skaters with training books to indicate practice areas, goals and skill acquisition plan.

Assessments*

Coaches may assess skaters during a lesson or as a designated activity on a regularly scheduled session.


*Please note: Assessments may take place at any time of the year and at any frequency. Coaches are expected to develop the quality of the skill prior to performing any assessments.

Specific examples of these teaching and learning activities content can be found here:

STAR 1-5 On and Off Ice Strategies

STAR 1-5 Terms and Definitions

GROUPING SKATERS for class work (stations, lanes, etc.)

Coaches may need to organize skaters into groups for different session formats. Coaches may use similar grouping strategies as outlined in the CanSkate Manual or devise their own.  For classes or lane type activities, coaches may group skaters for a strategic placement:

Example:

- Each line has a different level of skating ability

Or, use more random/fun options;

Examples:

- All skaters whose first names start with A to L – line 1, M to P -line 2, Q to Z – line 3

- Skaters wearing pink and purple in one group, etc.

- Skaters wearing green and blue in another and skaters wearing white or black in another

Cool down:

  • MUST include exercises to lower the heart rate and stretch out the major muscle groups.

Examples:

ON ICE

OFF ICE

CLASS containing edges, field moves and on ice stretches (moving)

CLASS containing some low level cardio activity and some easy stretches

Individual plans for each skater identifying proper cool down exercises appropriate for their level and development

Individual plans for each skater identifying proper cool down exercises appropriate for their level and development

Specific examples of cool down class content can be found here:

STAR 1-5 On and Off Ice Strategies 

For examples of sample schedules, please see: STAR 1-5 Sample Schedules

Budgeting for Maximum Coach Directed Time

There are 3 main strategies available to assist clubs and coaches in offering a program that maximized coach directed time.

CLUB DIRECTED: All fees are organized by the club and included in the registration fee. This would include ice fees and all coach’s fees for the entire program. No additional fees would be required by the skater’s families for lessons.

Example:

CLUB B is offering a STAR 1-2 Program for $810.00

This program includes 3 hours of ice per week fully coached and 3 off ice classes per week.

In this scenario, skaters will receive all of their coaching needed for this level within their program. No extra fees will be charged for private/group lessons.

COACH DIRECTED: All fees for the ice would be covered by the club’s registration fees. All fees for the lessons would be organized by the coaching staff. Coaches can organize a group lesson/class structure or a combination of group and private/semi private instruction for the skaters’ development. Coaches may opt to work as a team for this delivery model or choose to offer all discipline training themselves.

Example:

CLUB B is offering a STAR 1-2 Program for $510.00

This program includes 3 hours of ice per week with no coaching and 3 off ice classes per week.

In this scenario, the coaches work together to organize a lesson/class schedule that sees all on ice sessions fully coaches. The coaches will invoice the skaters individually to cover their time. In this scenario, it works out to $15.00 per week, per skater or a total of $300.00 in lesson fees. Total cost of the program is $810.00

CLUB – COACH DIRECTED (Hybrid Model): This model is a combination of both the Club Directed and Coach Directed options listed above. The club would decide how much coach time they could cover in their registration fees and the remaining time would then be organized by the coaching staff to ensure skaters are receiving the maximized amount of coach directed time.

Example:

CLUB B is offering a STAR 1-2 Program for $635.00

This program includes 3 hours of ice per week with some coaching and 3 off ice classes per week.

In this scenario, the club has decided to cover the costs of some of the coaching fees, usually this equates to the class time. Coaches then work together to organize a lesson/class schedule that sees the remainder of the on ice sessions be covered by lessons. The coaches will invoice the skaters individually to cover their time. In this scenario, it works out to $8.75 per week, per skater or a total of $175.00 in lesson fees. Total cost of the program is $810.00

Some clubs only offer a Private Lesson Model on figure skating sessions. The traditional version of this model limits the amount of coach directed time for skaters and is the costliest. It also requires more coaches per skaters which can be difficult for remote clubs.

Below is a comparison model to identify the advantages in comprehensive programming.

Coaching Staff Strategies

Classes

Classes are a great way to direct the skaters’ work and effort in a very cost effective and work productive manner. Classes may be offered to direct a number of development areas. Examples include:

  • Edges & Turns
  • Power
  • Spins
  • Jumps
  • Creative Movement
  • Field Moves
  • And more

Classes can be any length of time and may vary depending on the topic. Suggested times range from 10 to 30 mins.

Examples of format and content of suggested classes can be found here:

STAR 1-5 On and Off Ice Strategies

Clubs may have more coaches available than needed to run a “class” during a portion of the session. Below are some strategies that may assist the workload of the extra coaches.

  • Allow coaches to teach lessons through a class. Encourage those coaches to rotate their students so the skaters will have the opportunity to benefit from the classes on a rotational basis
  • Split the group of skaters in half and offer 2 classes, 1 off ice and 1 on the ice. Set up a rotation schedule so groups will alternate through the classes. Benefits of this scenario include:
    • Allows the opportunity to incorporate on and off ice programming in the same time slot
    • Allows skaters an opportunity to have more quality time with the coach (less skaters per group)
    • Allows the opportunity to use more than one coach for the same time slot
  • Rotate the coaches who are instructing the classes. This allows the skaters to reap the benefits of being exposed to the different coaches’ strengths while sharing work time amongst the coaching staff.
  • Coaches could also use the class time as an opportunity to provide one on one or small group planning sessions off ice. Again, it is suggested that coaches rotate their skaters to enable all skaters to take part in the classes on the ice as much as possible. Content for the off ice sessions could include: goal setting, monitoring, mental performance, off ice jump technique and more.

Lessons

There are 3 main types of lessons given by coaches for discipline development.

Private Lessons

  • This lesson format is a 1:1 ratio between coach and skater
  • This type of lesson is good for technical content in all disciplines

Advantages

Disadvantages

Full individual attention

Skaters can get complacent

 

Costly

 

Can be uncomfortable for some personalities

 

Skaters generally have more individual time. Not ideal for entry level skaters as they do not have the skill set to work on their own productively.

Semi-Private Lessons

  • This lesson format is a 1:2 ratio between coach and skater
  • This type of lesson is ideal for technical content
  • Good for motivating skaters to push development in areas of:
    • Speed, performance, acquisition

Advantages

Disadvantages

Individual attention

Personality conflicts could arise

Encourages peer learning

Could still have individual practice time inefficiencies

Provides peer motivation environment

 

More cost efficient

 

Could enable more lesson time within same budget

 

Group Lessons

  • This lesson format is a 1:3+ ratio between coach and skater
  • Technical content can be given easily
  • Group strategies activated to ensure individual feedback is given
  • Good for motivating skaters to push development in areas of:
    • Speed, performance, acquisition

Advantages

Disadvantages

Individual attention

Some coaches not comfortable with this method (therefore quality of lesson may be affected)

Encourages peer learning

Skaters may become distracted in group setting – inability to concentrate

Provides peer motivation environment

Inability to concentrate in group setting

More cost efficient

 

Could enable more lesson time within same budget

 

Team Coaching 

Team coaching can describe many different scenarios’. Essentially, team coaching is more than one coach working together to assist the development of a skater or group of skaters. Team coaching has many benefits including:

  • Maximizing or capitalizing coaches’ strengths
  • Creating an environment of experts
  • Allows skaters to be introduced to many different coaching styles
  • Allows an environment for more coach directed time
  • Enables more perspectives to contribute to individual training plans. 

Sample scenarios of team coaching:

Base Coach Directed: A Base Coach (manager and decision maker) will work with and coordinate with other coaches to give skater direction in the areas identified by the Base Coach.

Team Directed: Two (or more) coaches working together to plan and direct the skaters’ development in all areas. All coaches would be able to make decisions and be involved in lesson planning and direction.

Specialization Coaching: This scenario would see a coach lead their area of speciality. Communication needs to exist between coaches for maximum benefit to the skater. Each coach would make decisions for their area of development.

*Support Coaches: Coaches or clubs may decide to bring in a coach(es) on a regular or as-needed basis to enhance skater development and provide support to the core coaching staff.

Using Music in STAR 1-5

Music will be an integral part of the STAR 1-5 program. Coaches will use music for warm ups, cool downs, edge and turn sessions, power classes, dance step sessions, music interpretation, programs and more.

Music can also be used as a motivator or teaching tool to help:

  • Increase energy on the session
  • Increase or decrease speed or tempo of exercises
  • Teach rhythm or timing of steps
  • Explore movement, creativity and musicality

Look to many different sources, genres and time periods of music to keep sessions fun and add variety.

Programs (Solos)

The main focus in “Learn to Train” is on skill acquisition. With the recognition that many skaters will have various time commitments they can give to skating during this phase of development, it is important that the coaches time on the ice is spent on skill development vs choreography.

Programs in the STAR 1-4 program have been designed to be the same length to allow for easy transition through the skill development stages.  Coaches are encouraged to allow skaters to share programs, enabling many skaters to skate the same program in the early stages of development. This eases financial burden and allows for easy implementation in a group lesson format.  As the main focus is on the individual skill performance at this level, programs will be designed to be simple in nature, using choreography to instill the basic strategies of music interpretation and highlight accents.

To facilitate the easy distribution of music for programs at this level, coaches and clubs may decide to have a library of “stock” programs to use for skater’s/group lessons.  Advantages include:

  • No additional cost to skaters
  • Easy to teach in a group lesson format. All skaters learn the same program.
  • Easy to ensure all skaters have a chance to have their music played on sessions for practice. For example:
    • 10 skaters divided into 2 groups, each group learns 1 solo, therefore 2 solos played facilitates the needs of 10 skater’s practice.
  • Programs customizable to meet the development needs of the skater. For example, in the STAR 3 program, one spin can be a camel or a sit; one jump can be a flip or a lutz.
  • Skaters may use the same program in the STAR eventsThis is highly effective and cost efficient at the STAR 2 level in particular.

Scientific studies have shown that the skill of performance and music interpretation develops with age. The STAR program has integrated this philosophy into the assessment criteria to match the natural development of the skaters.  Skaters will be assessed on composition (choreography) at the next level in development

PROGRAM COMPONENT ASSESSMENT CRITERIA STAR 1-5

 

Skating Skills

Performance

Interpretation

Transitions

Composition

STAR 2

X

X

 

 

 

STAR 3

X

X

X

 

 

STAR 4

X

X

X

 

 

STAR 5

X

X

X

X

 

Dance Music

Skaters and coaches have some choices when deciding what music to use for the pattern dances in STAR 1-5.

  • Skate Canada Dance Music (Series 1-8)
  • Skate Canada identified Contemporary Music

Music for Classes

Using music in class formats will help skaters develop their sense of timing, rhythm as well encourage development of power and artistry.

Below are some examples (not mandatory nor limited to). Coaches are encouraged to use a variety of music throughout the STAR program to increase the skater’s awareness, knowledge and adaptability to different styles of music.

Class Focus

 

Skate Canada Dance Music

Contemporary Dance Music

Popular Music

 (fast tempo)

Popular Music

(slow tempo)

Popular Music

(medium tempo)

Classical Music

Creative Music

(alternative or specialized)

Edge Development

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Turn Development

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Power Development

X

X

X

 

 

X

X

Field Moves

X

X

 

X

 

X

X

Warm Up Exercises

X

X

X

 

X

X

X

Cool Down Exercises

X

X

 

X

 

X

X

Artistic Development

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Program Development

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Dance Steps

X

X

X

X

X

X

X


Session Allocation in the STAR 1-5 Program 

Due to the fluid and more accessible nature of assessments in the STAR 1-5 program, clubs may need to consider new classification strategies other than “tests passed” to organize skaters on sessions. Some suggestions are listed below:

Age and Stage

Allocating sessions for skaters of the same age range and level may be a good option. This strategy is very helpful when arranging off ice training for the athletes, as different age ranges require different attention. For example: Strength training for a 7-year-old looks much different than strength training for a 14-year-old. 

Clubs could use the skater’s freeskate event level, or the average of all 3 disciplines to establish level. For example:  If a skater is STAR 3 Dance, STAR 4 Freeskate and STAR 5 Skills, they would be considered a STAR 4 level skater.

Freeskate Level (Event/Competition)

Clubs may consider organizing skaters by level of Freeskate they are performing at Events or Competition.

Open Sessions

Open sessions allow for skaters at different levels to skate on the same ice. This is a great option for clubs that are trying to encourage skaters to pick up more sessions during the week to gain development, or for clubs who do not have a lot of skaters to make different sessions.

Open Discipline Training Sessions

Due to the nature of the cross training involved in the STAR 1-5 development, clubs may choose to offer discipline specific class time with open discipline training time. This will allow skaters the opportunity to practice or focus on their areas of need regardless of session title.

This is the preferred option for training schedules at this level.

Teaching Tips & Learning Activities

The following section reviews information and tips helpful for coaches teaching in the STAR 1-5 Program.

Teaching in the STAR program: The Mission of the Coach

(as per the Skate Canada LTAD Model)

The mission of the coach is to teach the basic sport specific skills and elementary artistic expression essential to participate in the chosen activity. Coaches must also introduce physical conditioning and fundamental mental skills. Sport specific skills are coupled with motor skill development. Coaches should continue to encourage children to be involved in several sports in the early part of this stage.

 While the skater’s parent(s)/guardians(s) will act as her/his manager in this stage, the coach will act as the director of development. Coaches have the option to train as a technical specialist but are also responsible for regular assessments and evaluations of a skater’s progression. Coaches have the ability to teach/transfer information in a manner appropriate to age, gender and an ability to teach good skill technique.

 All coaches potentially train world-class athletes but simply at a different stage of their development. Therefore, coaches of athletes in this stage of development need to understand figure skating at a level far beyond that at which their skaters may currently perform so they can provide relevant training at the appropriate time in preparation for the skater’s future. Coaches should always be able to provide a rationale for why they are teaching a certain skill or concept and how they are using the skater’s time.

Please visit LEARN TO TRAIN in the SKATE CANADA LTAD MODEL for a comprehensive list of skill acquisition expected at the exit phase of this stage.

Training Frequency 

The suggested quantity and frequency of ON ICE training at this level is as follows: (as per our LTAD Model)

Coach Directed Time

The suggested percentage of coach directed time vs individual practice is as follows:

Advantages of Coach Directed Time at this Level

  • The development of quality technique
  • Coaches to direct the skater’s focus on the basics in all areas to provide a foundation for future learning
  • Skaters are taught how to practice before being expected to practice on their own
  • Coaches can create an environment that is non-threatening, challenging and engaging

Coach directed time and/or group lessons at this stage of development have proven to be the most effective for skill acquisition and social development. It offers a cooperative, encouraging and motivating environment for the learner. It also allows for the maximum opportunity for the skaters to be under a coach’s direction during this “the golden age of learning”.

Training Strategies to Increase Coach Directed Time

Coaches are encouraged to use a variety of teaching strategies to engage the skater’s interest and different learning styles.  Below are examples of how you can incorporate various strategies into multiple delivery formats on your session. This is a guide only. Many coaches will discover new ways to offer topics. Regardless of the format you choose, always consider the following:

  • Ensure your delivery format encourages strong technique and growth
  • Rotate delivery methods to allow a variety of intensities, focus and ice usage.

Many of the strategies below lend themselves to a class type environment however some can be used in an individual practice scenario as well. Coaches and clubs are encouraged to use many different formats to deliver programming throughout their season.

For definitions of the terms below, please see : STAR 1-5 Terms and Definitions formats below, please see: STAR 1-5 On Ice Strategies 

For examples of specific content, see STAR 1-5 On and Off Ice Strategies

Option

Edges

Turns

Power

Field Moves

Jumps

Spins

Dance Steps

Warm Up

Cool Down

Dance

Patterns

Highway Lanes

 X  X  X  X  X

 

 X  X  X

 

Continuous Lanes

 X  X

 

 X  X  X  X  X  X

 

Perimeter Lanes

 X  X  X  X  X

 

 X  X  X

 

Class/Open Class

 

 

 X  X  X  X

 

 X  X  X

Group Lessons

 X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X  X

Stations

 X  X  X  X  X  X  X

 

 

 

Circuits

 X  X

 

 X  X  X  X

 

 

 

Engaged Supervised Practice

 

 

 

 X  X  X

 

 X  X  X

Teaching Tips

The following information may be used to assist coaches in the delivery of the STAR 1-5 program.

Identifying the Dominant Rotational Direction for Skaters

Determining which way a skater should rotate can be an easy task for some skaters, and more challenging for others. Generally, skaters will tend to use their dominant rotation direction for most rotational skills early in their development. These skills will display one direction that is acquired quicker and with more confidence.  For skaters who seem to turn both ways with the same ease, the following tips may help:

  • Have the skater skate away from you. Call the skater back or have them touch the boards and come back. Observe which direction they naturally turned to reverse their direction.
  • Off the ice, instruct the skater to jump up and turn a half turn or full turn in the air. Observe their natural direction. Ask them to jump the opposite direction for the same exercise. Compare.
  • Ask the skater to demonstrate all 4 forward 3-turns and observe for a direction that is done with more confidence.

Key Words

Key Words are an excellent tool to assist coaches in reinforcing the key points for any lesson. When key words are used correctly, the skaters will use them to remind themselves of the timing, rhythm or technique needed to execute the skill correctly. Key words can be identified for any skill.

Examples:

            Waltz Jump: “Hold….” (to indicate a strongly held BO edge entry) “Down…” (to indicate a solid knee bend on the FO take off edge), “Kick…” (to indicate the free foot passing the take off toe and extending for a good air position), “Land…” (to indicate a strong landing position)

Scheduling Variety

Adding variety to the schedule or session plan can help keep the energy in the training season.

Suggestions include:

  • Offering a time slot on a certain day that can service different needs.
    • Example: 5:00 – 5:30 every Thursday, each week could be a different focus
      • Week 1: Power Class
      • Week 2: Spin Session
      • Week 3: Creative Movement
      • Week 4: Simulation
      • Week 5: Challenge Day
      • Week 6: Jump Technique
      • Week 7: Field Move Class

Variety can also be offered within an actual session itself. Offering different delivery formats can help keep the skaters engaged and allow for many forms of coach directed time.

Example: Monday Session 5:00 to 6:00 pm

  • Week 1: 5:00 – 5:20 pm Edge/Turn Class, 5:20 – 5:50 pm Group Lessons, 5:50 – 6:00 pm Field Move Class
  • Week 2: 5:00 – 5:15 pm Power Class, 5:15 – 5:45 pm Jump Stations, 5:45 – 6:00 pm Spin Session
  • Week 3: 5:00 – 5:10 pm Warm Up Class, 5:10 – 5:50 pm Stations posted for skaters to use in practice time while coaches give private/semi private lessons, 5:50 – 6:00 pm Creative Movement class

Adding Fun

Ensuring there is an element of FUN in the training schedule is key to keeping the skaters motivated, interested and encouraging a strong club or team morale.  Some ideas include:

  • FUN Days to allow skaters to dress up or participate in activities throughout the year
  • Incentive programs (see INCENTIVE section for ideas)
  • Variety of session planning
  • Surprise days
  • Team Challenges within a session (to compliment the mission of the training period)

Allowing time in the schedule for skaters to have fun on the ice will encourage growth and expand comfort levels as well as contribute to club pride and morale.

Use Peer Coaching

Peer coaching is a term used to describe skaters helping skaters. This can be a great strategy to:

  • Establish relations between higher level and lower level skaters
  • Encourage confirmation of learning. When skaters have to explain or teach another skater a skill, it allows them to reconfirm technique and analyze how they achieve success.

Create Exercises

Exercises or drills is a term used to describe a predetermined set of movements that are used   to reinforce technique or development for skill acquisition. Exercises or drills can be used as a warm up routine or as a corrective measure.  Examples include:

  • Back Spin drills to assist with rotational axis awareness
    • Back spin with a jump out
    • Back spin that opens and closes several times in the same spin

Coaches can create exercises or drills for many different things or aspects of our sport.

  • Power (pushing, knee action)
  • Spins
  • Jump Technique (to increase height, get comfortable with toe take offs, etc)
  • Jump Technique (to increase comfort level with rotating axis)
  • Field Moves,
  • And more

Using All Disciplines to Strengthen the Skater’s Ability

Exposing skaters to all 3 disciplines in the same training plan will allow skaters to develop a well rounded skill repertoire that will serve as a foundation for acceleration in our sport.

 Skills will be the foundation for both freeskate and dance as it contains all essential pushes, turns and power skills.

Freeskate will introduce skaters to many concepts in spins and jumps.

Dance will encourage power, timing and carriage. This will strengthen both the freeskate and skills components as well.

Using Different Ways to Say the Same Thing

When delivering lessons, be sure to use cues that will appeal to different types of learning.

Key words and descriptive words will assist the auditory learners.

Exaggerated demonstrations and videos will assist the visual learners.

Teaching aids that need to be held, walk-throughs and body placement will assist the kinesthetic learners.

Finding different ways to say the same thing will be beneficial to your teaching as it will expand the presentation of any one skill. The more ways you can find to communicate the mission of your lesson, the more opportunities you will give to your skaters to learn.

Teaching Aids in the STAR Program

 Coaches want to ensure their skaters are being exposed to as many different learning styles as possible throughout the STAR program.  Using teaching aids will help coaches transfer information, provide kinesthetic and visual strategies and add variety to lessons.  Below are some ideas of how to incorporate teaching aids into the STAR program lessons.

TEACHING AID STRATEGY

JUMPS

SPINS

DANCE & DANCE STEPS

EDGES & TURNS

FIELD MOVES

 

PROGRAMS

Rotating Axis Props

(balls, stuffed animals, skate guards, different coloured gloves, etc.)

Used to help increase awareness of rotating axis. Skaters can hold the teaching aid in the hand of their rotating axis side and use it as an anchor to pull the other hand to it in the air or spin. Coaches may also use the teaching aid to help skaters check out of the jump or spin by having the skater look at that hand holding the teaching aid during the landing or exit. Balls of various sizes can be used for variety as well.

For spins, skaters may hold them in one hand and transfer them to the other hand at exit or entrance. They may also be used to emphasize arm placement in spin. Gloves may also be used as a visual aid to identify different focus points during the skill. Coaches can have the skaters wear different colour gloves and instruct the skater to look at a certain coloured glove at a distinct point of the skill.

 X  X

 

 

 

 

Harness

There are 2 main types of on ice harnesses: A fixed harness that has a designated path on the ice (attached to the ceiling) or a jumping pole that a coach holds as the skater skates freely on the ice. Both are good and can be used in different stages of jump development.

 X

 

 

 

 

 

Video & Video Library

Video playback and analysis is a very useful tool for skaters to see their positions and analyse their technique. Coaches may use traditional video cameras, or cameras and apps on their phones or tablets.  There are many video analysis applications made for sport available in digital technology. 

Coaches may also create video libraries of successful elements to be able to show skaters what a completed skill looks like before teaching it, or using it to inspire improvement. This is a great tool to use to give skaters a visual example of skills that can be achieved but are not currently being performed on the session.

 X  X  X  X  X  X

Partners

Coaches can pair up skaters to encourage speed, timing, presentation and other mimicking techniques when performing different skills.  This is an excellent way to add energy, encourage role modelling and have fun while improving technical and performance skills.

 X

 

 X  X  X

 

Posters/Pictures

Creating posters with pictures of proper positions is a helpful way to give the skaters a visual cue of the positions they are striving to achieve in their jumps, spins or field moves. They may also be used when creating STATIONS for STAR programs.

 X  X

 

 

 X

 

Markers/Liquid Chalk

Markers can be used to draw the pattern of the jumps, spins, steps, etc. on the ice. Coaches may also use markers to indicate the pattern of the approach to a jump. This is a very helpful tool to reinforce proper edges, timing and placement. Coaches may also use paper or tablets to draw the patterns, shapes or positions for the skaters.

 X  X  X  X  X  X

Bean Bags

Bean bags are a good tool to use when teaching proper body alignment in a spin or basic posture in skating. Placing a bean bag on the skater’s head for an upright (fwd or bwd) spin will encourage them to concentrate on proper posture and centering.

 

 X  X  X  X

 

Circuits

Circuits may be used in a lesson or as a tool for practice time. Coaches can lay out a pattern on the ice with the specific skills that they want the skater to practice and the skater will have something to guide their development during their practice time.

 X  X  X  X  X

 

Artistic Development

Coaches may want to use some teaching aids to help the development of artistry, encourage movement and inspire creativity.  Here are some ideas:

-          Chiffon scarves, beach balls, ribbons

-          Partner exercises (Mirroring, transference of movement, alternating movement, etc.)

-          Videos of other skaters or performers

Incentives

Coaches and clubs are encouraged to add incentives and challenge programming to their delivery and format. Adding incentives will bring awareness to quality development and encourage skaters to push their limits.

Below are some ideas of incentive and challenge programs that could be implemented into a session. Coaches and clubs are welcome to use any of these ideas or create their own.

It is recommended that coaches and clubs choose different incentives for different time periods of the training calendar that directly relate to the purpose of the preparation in that time period. Example: Toot your Horn is an excellent program to be placed in the weeks leading up to an important event or competition.

Name

Purpose

Description

Spin Bingo

Encourage skaters to develop aspects of their spinning ability. This exercise can be adjusted to meet the developmental needs of any level of skater.

Design bingo type cards for each skater depending on their skill level. Skaters work to achieve each spin in each box. When they feel it is ready, they show a coach and if they performed it to expectation, they receive a sticker to place in the box. The mission is to cover the entire grid with stickers!

The BINGO concept can be easily reworked to address development in Field Moves (Field Moves Bingo: each square contains a different move, foot, edge and direction designation)

Jump Combos (each square contains a different jump combo)

And more!

High Five Program

Recognize consistency in skill performance

Cut out hands from construction paper to be used to post on a wall or bulletin board. Coaches identify what skills they are looking for the skater to perform consistently. When the skater demonstrates they can perform that skill 5 times in a row successfully, their name and skill are added to a hand and posted in a designated area.

This program is easily adaptable to any discipline and may also be used to recognize behaviours and attitudes (ex: sportsmanship, tenacity, etiquette, etc.)

Ring the Bell or

Toot your Horn

Encourage consistency in clean program run-throughs

Have a bell or horn at the side of the boards. When skaters skate a clean program, they skate over to the bell or horn to ring it or toot it. The coaches and other skaters on the ice are then encouraged to clap and congratulate the skater on a job well done.

Golden Gloves

To encourage presentation and program components

Purchase yellow or gold mini gloves from the dollar store or comparable. Inform the skaters that the coaches will be looking for skaters who are shining when performing or practicing. Ensure the skaters have been given the tools and training in this area before implementing this program (understanding of strong landing positions, good posture with eye focus upwards, extension and presentation of gestures). Coaches can award the golden gloves to skaters at any time during practices. It is suggested to run this incentive for a 2-4-week period to highlight focus.

Key words that can be used with this program include: Golden touch, sparkle, shine, world or Olympic, etc.

Fearless Fridays

To encourage the development of skills, speed and power.

Create a time slot on a Friday that can be used as a “challenge session”. Coaches can challenge the skaters to many different activities during this time slot that will strengthen the personal development of each skater.

Prizes or points can be awarded to skaters who are successful.

Sample ideas:

-          Fastest lap around the ice (Fwd/Bwd/CW/CCW)

-          Spin challenges (# of rotations, # of positions per foot, speed of rotations, position perfection, flying spins, death drops, variations, etc.)

-          Jump challenges (measure distances, jumps with speed, jump combinations or multiple combinations, fun jumps like mazurka, walleys, stag or split jumps, etc.)

-          Field Move challenges (highest spiral, longest held positions, introduction of different moves, etc.)

Incentive programs can be extended to off ice program, behaviour traits or self tracking/goal setting practices. For example:

-          Rewards for off ice fitness achievements:


Example of a SPIN BINGO Card (STAR 4 or 5 level skater):

SPIN BINGO

 

 

Fwd sit

8 revs

 

 

Broken leg spin

4 revs

Flying camel

(proper take off)

4         revs

A-Frame Spin

3 revs

 

Fwd Y spin

3 revs

 

Fwd Corkscrew

Bwd sit – pancake

3 revs

Layback

4 revs

 

Flying sit spin

3 revs

 

 

Sit jump sit

(same foot)

3 revs for each

Camel-Sit change

Camel-Sit

(fwd or bwd entry)

Bwd corkscrew

 

Fwd camel

 8 revs

 

 

Bwd sit

 4 revs

Bwd camel catch

3 revs

Thompson Spin

3 revs

STAR 1-5 On and Off Ice Strategies

ON ICE: Examples of class content and stations

On-Ice Classes

Below are some examples that coaches may use to guide their skaters in on-ice classes. Coaches will be expected to expand and explore content as their sessions evolve and grow in skill development.

Strategies to Consider

Please note: To accommodate a variety of levels, coaches can use some of the following strategies:

  • Assign different exercises to different levels of skaters
  • Start with the simple exercises and allow all skaters to try all skills regardless of level
  • Assign different lanes to each level (Highway lane format)
  • Assign a continuous lane circuit for each level (Divided continuous lane format or a superimposed continuous lane format)

CONTINOUS LANES: (see definition in STAR 1-5 Terms and Definitions)

  • Set the skills for each lane. Allow skaters to run it through a couple of times then add onto or change the skills in each lane
  • Allow skaters at different levels to do the skill appropriate for them in each lane. For example, STAR 1-2’s could be doing forward 3-turns in a lane, while STAR 3 & up skaters could perform backward 3-turns in the same lane. 

HIGHWAY LANES: (see definition in STAR 1-5 Terms and Definitions)

  • Add music for rhythm and/or interest
  • Start with simple skills and increase difficulty on each restart or every other restart
  • Could separate different levels of skaters into different lanes or allow them to be integrated into whole group
  • Could use “return to start” path along the perimeter of the ice as a rest area where skaters can skate back to start at leisure, or as a place to put another skill to practice or use as a stretch.

The following charts and diagrams are examples of skills, exercises or drills that can be used in many different classes for different purposes. The information below is meant to be used as a resource or guide. Coaches are encouraged to continue to explore these applications and create classes that fit the development needs of their skaters.  Coaches are also encouraged to continue to add variety, challenge and fun into these classes to keep the skaters engaged and continually exposed to new skills or exercises. This will increase the effectiveness and support a well-rounded development training environment.

General Warm Up

Objective:

-          To warm up the body (increase blood flow and body temperature)

-          To re-establish skating balance on blades and reinforce connection with the ice

-          To warm up rotational exercises to prepare skaters for the session

Sample exercises to warm up body temperature (Fwd & Bwd)

Sample exercises to re-establish blade balance and pressure (Fwd & Bwd)

Sample rotational exercises

Formats that can be used

Running (using full blades)

Running crosscuts

Deep knee bend sculling 

Sculling with jumps

Fast skating

2 foot slaloms

2 foot slaloms with jumps

1 foot slaloms

Quick edges

Lunges with body twists

Sculling with rotational jumps

Twizzles

BO 3-turn/MoHawk/Landing position

·         Continuous lanes

·         Highway lanes

·         Perimeter lanes

·         Open class

Power ClassPower Class

Objective:

-          To develop more power on pushing and acceleration 

-          To increase the comfort level of the skater at higher speeds

Sample exercises to increase power on pushes

Sample exercises to comfort level at higher speeds

Formats that can be used

Running crosscuts

Power crosscuts

Deep edge slaloms

 (2 ft and 1 ft)

Deep knee sculling

 

Power Edge Turn exercises:

-          3-turns

-          MoHawks

Quick edges

Crosscut, swing change of edge

Crosscut, swing change of edge, 3-turn

Power crosscuts

Power jumps

Power field moves

Power presentation

Russian stroking

Power 3-turns into jumps

Highway lanes

Perimeter lanes

Open class

Structured class

Open class

Edge/Turn Class*

*All edges and turns will be taught in “figure form” in the STAR 1-5 Skills program. Using this form in your classes may help skaters establish basics for that discipline. Power and presentation can be added as skaters acquire a strong foundation in the basics.

Objective:

-          To teach, develop and reinforce proper technique for all edges and pushes 

-          To teach, develop and reinforce proper technique for all turns

Sample edge development skills

Sample turn development skills

Formats that can be used

FO edges

FI edges

BO edges

BI edges

Forward change of edges

Backward change of edges

Slaloms (2 ft and 1 ft, Fwd & Bwd)

Quick edges (FI & BI)

Cross rolls (FO & BO)

Change of edges with turns

1 foot slaloms with turns

Forward 3-turns

FI MoH/BO 3-turns

BI 3-turns/FI MoH

FO 3-turn/BI 3-turns

FI 3-turn/BO 3-turns

Forward double threes

Backward double threes

BO 3-turn/FI MoH/BO edge

FO & FI Twizzles

BO & BI Twizzles

2 ft or 1 ft multi turns

FO bracket/BO bracket

FI bracket/BI bracket

Continuous lanes

4 lane highway

Perimeter lanes

Dance Steps Class

Objective:

-          To teach, review and develop power in dance steps

Sample Dance Steps

Formats that can be used

Swing Rolls (fwd & bwd)

Progressives (fwd & bwd)

Chasses (fwd & bwd)

Slide Chasses

Progressive – Swing Roll sequence (cw & ccw)

Cross rolls

3-turns (closed feet)

FI MoH (closed or open)

Swing change of edge

Any combination of steps used in dances

Coaches can play different dance music to explore different timing and rhythms of:

-          Waltzes

-          Tangos

-          Swings

-          Fox trots

-          Contemporary Music

Continuous lanes

Highway lanes

Perimeter lanes

 

Field Move Class

Objective:

-          To introduce, teach and develop a variety of field moves 

Sample Field Moves

Formats that can be used

Forward spirals

Backward spirals

Blade catch spirals (fwd & bwd)

Y- Spirals (fwd & bwd)

Drags (fwd & bwd)

1 foot sit glides (fwd & bwd)

Spread eagles (bent legs, straight legs)

Ina Bauers

Pivots

Hydro blading

Intermediate positions

Continuous lanes

4 lane highway

Perimeter lanes

Open class

Creative Movement Class

Objective:

-          To teach, develop and explore different ways to move to music

-          To encourage the development of projection and interpretation relating to mood or energy of the music 

Sample creative movement exercises:

Formats that can be used

Play a piece of music and ask skaters to:

-          Move only one body part while gliding (elbows, head, hands, hips, etc.)

-          Use all of their blades to move (toe picks, heels, etc.)

-          Move only in a designated level (low, med or high)

-          Portray the mood of the music in their movements (happy, sad, sly, excited, etc.)

-          Combine some of the above, for example: Focus on hand movements, while on toe picks, feeling excited.

Using props or partners:

-          Mimic actions

-          Transfer movement or energy

-          Mirror actions

 

Using a piece of music have skaters act out a story

 

Explore different genres, styles and themes:

-          Western, Spanish, Rock n Roll, etc.

-          Classical, Pop, Alternative, etc.

 

Highway lanes

Continuous lanes

Structured class

Open class

Structured Class

Have the skaters start anywhere on the ice and instruct them to move as if the music is telling them what to do.

Examples:

  • Sharp music could be interpreted by sharp, quick movements
  • Softer music could be interpreted with slower more flowy movements.
  • Fast music could be interpreted with more speed or faster movements. The opposite could apply for slow music.

Coaches can also instruct the skaters to use different levels, body parts, emotions and projection points to increase awareness and range of motion.

General Cool Down

Objective:

-          To encourage and teach skaters the value of a proper cool down

-          To promote flexibility and good maintenance of muscles 

Sample cool down exercises

Formats that can be used

Forward drags

Moving hamstring stretch (fwd or bwd)

Pancake/Tuck sit stretch

Catch spirals

Y-spirals

Moving quad stretch

Deep breaths with sculling and giant arm circles

 

Gliding with good posture neck stretches

 

Deep breath, full extension upwards to exhale and low crouch with a rounded back

Continuous lanes

Highway lanes

Perimeter lanes

Structured class


Warm Up

 

Power

Edges and Turns

Dance Step Class

 

Field Moves

 

Creative Movement Class

Cool Down

 

Stations

The purpose of a STATION is to:

  • Give skaters guidance for their practice time
  • Ensure skaters are practicing and focusing on the correct areas of their training
  • Remind skaters about key points or progressions to be used on a daily basis
  • Build good training habits for self-directed practice later in development

IDEAS for STATION CONTENT (general): Coaches are encouraged to use pictures, diagrams or drawings to help reinforce teaching points, key area of focus or daily mission. Below are some ideas. Coaches are expected to customize their stations to meet the needs of their session and skaters.

JUMP STATION

SPIN STATION

PROGRAM STATION

FIELD MOVE STATION

CHALLENGE STATION

DANCE STATION

SKILLS STATION

Jumps

Jump combos

Jump exercises

Landings

Jumps in program

Jumps with speed

Jumps with distance

Jumps with height

Walkthroughs

 

 

Basic spins

Change foot spins

Flying spins

Spin variations

Combo spins

Fun spins

Intermediate spins

 

Focus areas:

-          Speed of spin

-          Centering

-          Positioning

Perform program and focus on:

-          Presentation

-          Speed

-          Landings

-          Spins

 

 

List of all field moves with pictures.

 

Focus areas:

-          Speed

-          Arms

-          Presentation

-          Variations

-          Hold for 5 seconds

A fun station that can explore many areas:

-          Split jumps

-          Spins held for 5 rotations

-          Mazurkas

-          Spinning or jumping the other way

Dance steps

 

Dance patterns

 

Shadow dance with another skater

 

Edges

Turns

 

Stroking exercises


IDEAS for STATION CONTENT (specific):

Coaches may also decide to use stations as part of a specific session. Below are some ideas to identify different stations that could be used on specific sessions.

Dance

 Session

Skills

Session

Jump

Session

Spin

Session

Field Move

Session

Dance Step Station

-          Review and practice dance steps

 

 

Dance Pattern Station

-          Practice , review dance pattern

 

Music Station

-          Perform dance to music (solo, shadow or partner)

Edge Station

-          All edges and change of edges, circle on circle exercises

-          Could use a full ice circuit

 

Turn Station

-          All turns

-          Could draw them on the ice to follow

 

Stroking Station

-          All stroking exercises

-          Can use assessment or practice pattern

 

Field Move Station

-          All field moves

 

Power Jump Station

-          Each jump 3 times

-          As much speed as possible

-          Hold landings for 3 sec

 

Combo Jump Station

-          All jumps with loop on end

-          All jumps with toe loop on end

-          Add loop/loop to all

-          Add toe/toe to all

 

Developing Jump Station

-          Walkthroughs

-          Attempts from standstill

-          Etc.

Basic Spin Station

-          Review, practice all basic spin positions

-          Try to hold for 3-4 rotations

 

Change Foot Spin Station

-          Practice all basic spins with a change of foot.

-          Can do forward or backward entry

 

Combo Spin Station

-          Give skaters a list of combo spins to try, practice

 

Flying Spin Station

-          Practice flying spins listed

 

Variation Spin Station

-          Provide a list of variations to explore

Spiral Station

-          All spirals held for 5 seconds on curves

-          Add a different arm position for each spiral

-          Perform spiral, drop leg, lift leg, drop leg, repeat

-          Assisted spirals (catch blade spirals)

 

Ina Bauers and Spread Eagles

-          Inside CW & CCW

-          Outside CW & CCW

-          Add speed, lean, arms

 

FUN Moves

-          1 foot sit glides

-          Y-Spirals

-          Hydro blading

-          Etc.

 

OFF ICE CLASSES: Examples of class content

Below are some examples that coaches may use to guide their off ice classes. Coaches will be expected to expand and explore content as their sessions evolve and grow in skill development.

STRATEGIES and TIPS for off ice classes:

  • Skaters should have good foot wear on to give the feet proper support
  • Multiple spaces can be utilized. Consider using hallways, lobbies, dressing rooms, fields, meeting rooms, stair ways, gymnasiums etc. If spaces can be found with rubberized flooring, this is best.
  • All off ice classes should be supervised for safety
  • Skaters may perform off ice warms and cool downs on their own after they have been trained on the proper exercises and expectation of conduct.

Off ice jump class

Objective:

-          To introduce and develop awareness, rotational axis and vertical launch.

-          To teach and develop technique for on ice jump

Sample off ice jump exercises (basic)

Be sure skaters have:

2 foot vertical jumps

-          No rotation

-          ½ rotation

-          Full rotation

-          1 ½ rotations

-          2 rotations

 

Focus on good body alignment, rotation initiating from hips. Maintain level head and shoulders, controlled arms and straight legs in the air

Stationary landing position

Walk through of all jumps (focusing on proper positioning)

Jump throughs (same as a walk through with a quick launch to the rotating position, finishing rotation on the floor)

Perform all jumps (with control and landings)

 

Coaches are encouraged to use many other coordination type exercises good for off ice jump classes while maintaining a strong core.

 

-          Enough room to move freely

-          Wear proper foot attire (good running shoes) and athletic attire

To work on explosive power, coaches can use jump rope and stair training to increase vertical launch.

 

Sample jump rope exercises:

-          Keeping arms at sides and legs straight; use ankles and toes to jump rope maintaining good posture.

-          Add challenge by jumping on one foot, then the other (can cross ankles into rotating position) and attempting doubles (one jump with rope going around the skater twice)

 

Sample stair exercises:

-          Using a flight of stairs, have skaters spring up the stairs focusing on extension of ankles.

-          Coaches can add challenge by instructing skaters to skip 1 step and then 2 steps. Skaters can also do two foot jumps on each step, then skip 1 step, then 2 steps. This exercise can also be done on one foot, then the other foot.

 

Off ice warm up (general)

Objective:

-          To introduce and develop warm up strategies

-          To ready the skaters for the on ice session while enhancing their strength, coordination, flexibility and awareness

Sample warm up exercises (basic)

Be sure skaters have:

5 mins of general cardio (jump rope, running, stairs, etc.)

Running backwards

“h” hops

Karaoke (grapevine) both ways

Side gallops

Arm circles (forwards, backwards)

Leg swings (forward, back, and side)

Anything from off ice jump

Coordination type exercises

-          Enough room to move freely

-          Wear proper foot attire (good running shoes) and athletic attire

 

Mental Prep (general)

Objective:

-          The objective of this class is to introduce the skaters to mental training strategies that will benefit their preparation and practice on the ice.

Coaches can introduce exercises to teach awareness in the following areas:

Additional resources:

Goal Setting

Relaxation

Visualization

Session planning

Focus and refocus

Coping strategies for frustration and fear

Positive/Effective self-talk

Yearly planning

-          Coaches may want to set up training books for the skaters (see Appendix D)

-          There are many books, articles and videos available to help guide coaches.

 

Sample additional off ice classes:

Objective:

-          To introduce the skaters to a variety of ways to move and strengthen their bodies and minds

Ideas include (but are not limited to):

Yoga

Pilates

 

Health and Wellness

-          Nutrition, sleep, mindfulness, self-esteem, etc.

Fitness

-          Strength training

-          Flexibility

-          Agility

-          Plyometrics

-          Balance

Dance

-          Ballet, Modern, Jazz etc

 

Theatre

-          Drama, projection, confidence

  

Descriptions and Standards - SKILLS

 

Continuum of Development

 

 

     

Criteria

Advance Stage of Development

Moderate Stage of Development

Early Stage of Development

Edge Quality:

Quality of edge

·        Fully defined edges

·        Consistent balance

·         Moderately defined edges

·         Generally balanced

·     Weak edges and/or
wobbles

·     Inconsistent or weak balance

Technique:

Proper mechanics demonstrated

·     Pushes from side of blade

·      Equal thrust on both feet in crosscuts

·        Correct knee action

·  Generally, pushes from side of blade

·  One dominant thrust may be evident

·    Some knee bend evident

·  Thrust technique not properly executed

·  Little knee bend – stroking choppy

·     Some toe-pushing may be evident

Execution:

Balance, control, agility

·  Skates on true edges

·  Strong body lean demonstrated

·   Skater has consistent balance

·  Edges of moderate quality

·  Some body lean demonstrated

·    Generally balanced

·  Weak edges and wobbles

·  Little to no body lean demonstrated

·     Balance inconsistent or weak

Power:

Ability to generate and maintain speed

·   Demonstrates ability to accelerate and maintain speed

·    Demonstrates reasonable maintenance of speed

·  Skater seems slow

·  Unable to generate and maintain speed 

·     Movements may seem laboured

Position:

Quality of positions in field moves

·   Solid posture maintained

·   Full free leg extension (Spiral)

·    Slight break in posture

·    Partial free leg extension (Spiral)

·     Significant break in

posture

·     No free leg extension (Spiral)

Duration:

Length of position

 

·   Able to maintain position for 3 seconds or more (on each foot Spiral circle or sequence)

 

·    Able to maintain spiral position for 3 seconds on one foot and second foot for no less than 2 seconds (Spiral circle or sequence)

·    Able to hold Field Move position for 2 seconds or more

·      Unable to hold spiral position on either foot for 2 seconds

·     Holds field move position for less than 1 second

 

 

NOTE: All edges and turns in the STAR 1-5 program are to be performed using "figure form".  Please review the definition of figure form before teaching these elements to the skaters.

 

SKILLS

Skill

Description

Minimum Performance Standard

STAR 1

2 of 3 of the criteria listed

Forward edges

Starting from a standstill, skater pushes off onto FO or FI edge. Using a line for axis across the width of the ice, the skater will execute a series of lobes on designated edge using blade pushes. Once the skater has reached the other end of the ice, they will return across the width by performing a series of forward lobes on the opposite edge. Skaters are required to perform edges with “figure form” in a controlled manner.

Must perform a min of 4 FO edges and 4 FI edges

 

Reason able for level:
- Solid body lean on 50% or more

75% of pushes from the blade (3 of 4 edges)

-   Reasonable control

Forward 3-turns

 

Starting from a standstill, a glide or a set number of prescribed steps, the skater may choose foot and starting edge as they perform a forward 3-turn. The skater may or may not return to a standstill position for the subsequent turns. Demonstrating “figure form”, the skater must demonstrate a 2 second glide entering and exiting the turn. The skater may perform the turns in any order and must demonstrate unweighting during each turn.

 

A 3-turn is a 180 degree turn on one foot that is executed by rotating towards the center of the lobe (circle) and stays on the same lobe (circle).

All 4 forward turns must be performed

 

Reasonable for level:

-          Solid lean on 50% or more

-          75% of turns demonstrating

a 2 second glide in and out of turn (3 of 4 turns)

-          Reasonable control

 

Forward Inside MoHawk Turn Sequence

 

Using a line for an axis, skaters may start from a standstill or a glide and may choose starting foot. Push onto a forward inside edge to perform a FI Mohawk. From the BI edge, step onto the same lobe with the opposite foot to execute a BO edge. Hold this edge to the axis line.  At the line, change lobes and step forward onto an inside edge to perform the same sequence on the opposite foot. The skater should aim to perform the FI Mohawk on the 1st ½ of the lobe, leaving the last ½ of the lobe to hold the BO edge. Blade pushes should be used throughout.

Must perform a min of 4 sequences (2 on each foot)

 

-          75% of sequence demonstrating proper turn and pushing technique (3 of 4)

-          Reasonable acceleration and knee action

-          Stable for 75% of exercise (3 of 4)

STAR 1 Stroking

(Basic)

Starting from forwards skating, the skater will complete a large circle of forward crosscuts at one end of the ice (between blue line and goal line) in either clockwise or counter-clockwise direction. After one full circle, the skater will then skate off the circle at the next corner to execute a series of blade pushes across the ice diagonally to the opposite corner. At this corner the skater will perform at 3-turn or FI Mohawk to turn backwards.  The skater will then skate a full circle of backwards crosscuts and come out of the next corner to execute a backward push/glide sequence across the ice diagonally to the opposite corner.

 

This pattern is called X & O and will be used throughout the STAR 1-5 program.

 

Skaters must practice this in both starting directions (CW and CCW).

One full pattern must be performed. Skater may choose starting direction.

 

-          75% of exercise demonstrating proper pushing technique (fwd and bwd)

-          Reasonable acceleration and knee action

-          Stable for 75% or more of the exercise

Forward Spiral Circles

 

Skaters may start in clockwise or counter clockwise direction. Skating on a large circle forwards, skaters will gain enough speed to execute a forward spiral on their leg of choice. After holding the spiral for as long as they can, they may skate around the same circle with as many steps as they like and perform another forward spiral on the opposite foot. This exercise must then be repeated in the opposite direction.

All 4 forward spirals must be performed. (RFO, LFO, RFI, LFI)

 

-          Reasonable body line

-          Min of 1 spiral per foot at hip level or higher for 1 second or more

-          Reasonable control and edge quality (no straight lines)

 

Field move of choice

 

Forward 1-foot sit glide: (formerly shoot the duck) A one-foot movement in which a skater travels along the ice with one leg in a strongly bent position and the other leg directed forward parallel to the ice.

-          Skater must demonstrate a 90-degree angle or more on the skating foot

 

Ina Bauer: A two-footed movement in which the skater travels along the ice with one foot on a forward edge/tracing and the other on a matching backward edge behind the skater running parallel to the forward tracing. Spacing between the edges/tracings should be greater than 24 cms. The more proficient the skater becomes at this move, the greater the distance between the tracings.

-          May be on a straight line or inside curve

Spread eagle: A curving, two-footed movement in which the skater skates with one foot on a forward edge and the other on a matching backward edge on the same curve (ex. outside/outside or inside/inside).

-          May be performed on an inside or outside edge. Some knee bend permissible

 

 

 

 

 

Only 1 field move (skaters’ choice) to be performed

 

-          Reasonable body line

-          Position held for 1 second or more

-          Reasonable balance & control

 

STAR 2

Criteria marked with an (*) is mandatory for passing standard

Backward edges

Starting from a standstill, skater pushes off onto BO or BI edge on either the left or right foot. Using a line for axis, the skater will execute a series of lobes on the designated edge using c-pushes. Once the skater has reached the other end of the ice, they will return to their start by performing a series of lobes on the opposite edge. Skaters are required to perform edges with “figure form” in a controlled manner.

Must perform a min of 4 BO edges and 4 BI edges

 

Reasonable for level

-          *Solid body lean on 50% or more

-          75% of pushes from the blade (3 of 4 edges)

-          Reasonable control

Backward 3-turns

Starting from a standstill, a glide or a set number of prescribed steps, the skater may choose foot and starting edge. The skater may or may not return to a standstill position for the subsequent turns. The skater must demonstrate a 2 second glide entering and exiting the turn using "figure form". The skater may perform the turns in any order and demonstrate some unweighting during each turn.

All 4 backward 3 turns must be performed

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *Solid lean on 50% or more

-          75% of turns demonstrating

a 2 second glide in and out of turn (3 of 4 turns)

-          Reasonable control

 

Forward circle on circle

Starting from a standstill, the skater may start with the left or right foot, outside or inside edge. The skater performs one blade push onto an edge and holds that edge for a full circle. During that circle the skater should display figure form and move the body in a quiet and controlled manner. For example; after the push off, the free foot should come towards the skating leg in a “toe to heel” position for the 1st half of the circle, during the 2nd half of the circle the free foot will then move to the front of the skating foot in a “heel to toe” position demonstrating "figure form". This transition should be performed with a stable core and in a controlled manner.

Once the skater has completed the 1st circle on one foot/edge, they will then perform another blade push to complete a 2nd circle approximately the same size and pattern as the 1st circle, thus creating a “circle on circle” exercise.

 

Two complete circles (one on each foot) on different edges.

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *Solid body lean on 50% or more

-          Pushes from the blade

-          Reasonable control

 

Skaters may choose direction for assessment.

 

2 foot & 1 foot multi turns

 

Starting from backwards skating, the skater will perform 2 hip-twist like turns on two feet in one direction and then push backwards to perform 2 hip twist like turns in the opposite direction. These turns are exactly like the 2 foot multi turns from Stage 6 CanSkate. After the skater has executed 2 sets of 2 foot turns, the skater will then push onto a BI edge to perform 2 – 1 foot turns of the same nature in one direction (3-turn/bracket) and then push onto the opposite foot for another BI entry to 2-1 foot turns in the other direction

 

1 complete set of:

-          2 2ft turns one way

-          2 2ft turns the other way

-          2 1ft turns one way

-          2 1ft turns the other way

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *75% of turns correct

-          *75% of pushes with blade

-          Reasonable knee action

-          Stable for 75% or more of the exercise

 

Forward outside turn sequence

 

 

Starting from a standstill or forward skating the skater will execute FO 3-turn, backward crosscut on one lobe and then change lobes to execute a FO 3-turn, backward crosscut on the opposite lobe. The skater will repeat this sequence to perform a total of 2 RFO 3-turns and 2 LFO 3-turns.  The skater may start the exercise on their foot of choice. An example of the turn sequence is:

RFO-RBI 3turn, LBO-RBI crosscut, LFO-LBI, RBO-LBI crosscut…

 

4 complete sets completed (2 on each foot)

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *75% of turns must demonstrate solid edge in and out

-          75% of pushes must be executed correctly

-          Reasonable knee action

-          Stable for 75% or more of the exercise


 

STAR 3

 

STAR 3 Stroking

(Power)

 

Starting from forwards skating, the skater will complete a large circle of forward crosscuts at one end of the ice (between blue line and goal line) in either clockwise or counter-clockwise direction. The crosscuts will be performed using the “tempo” pacing of 2 crosscuts with 4 – 2 beat pushes and 4 crosscuts using 8 – 1 beat pushes. The skater repeats this tempo of crosscuts for an entire circle and continues until they have reached the corner of the ice to start their X pattern. The 1st part of the X is executed by performing a 2-foot forward slalom to the mid line (red line) of the ice. At the mid line, the skater will then shift the slalom to 1 foot for the remaining of the X which will proceed diagonally to the opposite corner. At this corner the skater will perform at 3-turn or FI Mohawk to turn backwards.  The skater will repeat this exercise with a backward tempo crosscut circle and a backward 2-foot slalom to 1-foot slalom across this ice diagonally.   Skaters must practice this in both starting directions (CW and CCW).

The 1-foot slalom part of this exercise should be trained on both feet in both directions. For the assessment, the skater may choose their foot for both forwards and backwards.

 

 

One full pattern must be performed. Skater may choose starting direction

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *Acceleration and knee action

-          75% of exercise demonstrating proper pushing technique (fwd and bwds)

-          Stable for 75% or more of the exercise

 

Forward spiral circles

 

 

As in STAR 1, skaters may start in clockwise or counter clockwise direction. Skating on a large circle forwards, skaters will gain enough speed to execute a forward spiral on their leg of choice. After holding the spiral for as long as they can, they may skate around the same circle with as many steps as they like and perform another forward spiral on the opposite foot. This exercise must then be repeated in the opposite direction.

 

All 4 forward spirals must be performed. (RFO, LFO, RFI, LFI)

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *Body line, 1 spiral per foot hip level or higher

-          1 spiral must be held 3 seconds or more and other spiral must be held for no less than 2 seconds

-          Reasonable control and edge quality (no straight lines)

 

 

Field move of choice

 

 

Backward 1-foot sit glide: See description in STAR 1 (Fwd 1-foot sit glide)

-          Skater must demonstrate a 90-degree angle or more

Forward Y Spiral: Skater holds free leg by the skate or blade to side to create a Y stance.

-          Free foot to reach shoulder height or higher

Spread eagle: See description in STAR 1

-          May be performed on an inside or outside curve with straight legs.

Ina Bauer: See description in STAR 1

-          Performed on a straight line or a curve facing outside

 

 

Only 1 field move to be performed

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *Body line

-          Position held for 2 seconds or more

-           Reasonable balance & control

 

STAR 4

 

Forward brackets

 

Starting from a standstill, a glide or a set number of prescribed steps, the skater may choose foot and starting edge as they perform a forward bracket. The skater may or may not return to a standstill position for the subsequent turns. Demonstrating “figure form”, the skater must demonstrate a 2 second glide entering and exiting the turn. The skater may perform the turns in any order and must demonstrate unweighting during each turn.

 

A bracket is a 180 degree turn on one foot that is executed by rotating away from the center of the lobe (circle) and stays on the same lobe (circle).

 

All 4 forward turns must be performed

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *Solid lean on 50%  or more

-          *75% of turns demonstrating

a 2 second glide in and out of turn (3 of 4 turns)

-          Reasonable control, balance, form and agility

 

Backward brackets

 

Starting from a standstill, a glide or a set number of prescribed steps, the skater may choose foot and starting edge. The skater may or may not return to a standstill position for the subsequent turns. Keeping the toe of the free leg close to the heel of the skating leg, the skater must demonstrate a 2 second glide entering and exiting the turn demonstrating "figure form". The skater may perform the turns in any order and demonstrate some unweighting during each turn.

 

All 4 backward turns must be performed

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *Solid lean on 50% or more

-          *75% of turns demonstrating

a 2 second glide in and out of turn (3 of 4 turns)

-          Reasonable control, balance, form and agility

 

 

Forward double threes

 

Starting from a standstill, a glide or a set number of prescribed steps, the skater may choose foot and starting edge. The skater will perform a forward 3-turn followed by a backward 3-turn on the same lobe. The skater may or may not return to a standstill position for the subsequent turns. Keeping the free leg close to the skating leg in "figure form", the skater must demonstrate a 2 second glide entering and exiting EACH turn. The skater may perform the turns in any order and demonstrate some unweighting during each turn.

 

All 4 forward turns must be performed

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *Solid lean on 50% or more

-          *75% of turns demonstrating

a 2 second glide in and out of turn (3 of 4 turns)

-          Reasonable control, balance, form and agility

 

 

Backward circle on circle

 

Starting from a standstill, the skater may start with the left or right foot, outside or inside edge. The skater performs one “C” push onto an edge and holds that edge for a full circle. During that circle, the skater should display "figure form" and move the body in a quiet and controlled manner. For example:  After the push off, the free foot should be lifted off the ice and be held in a “heel to toe” position in front of the skating foot for the 1st half of the circle, during the 2nd half of the circle the free foot will then move to the back of the skating foot in a “toe to heel” position. This transition should be performed with a stable core and in a controlled manner. The upper body may need to rotate as well moving the arms and head separately to encourage balance and control.

Once the skater has completed the 1st circle on one foot/edge, they will then perform another “C” push to complete a 2nd circle approximately the same size and pattern as the 1st circle, thus creating a “circle on circle” exercise.

 

 

Two complete circles (one on each foot) on different edges.

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *Solid body lean on 50% +

-          *Pushes from the blade

-          Reasonable control, balance, form and agility

 

 

Skater must draw for direction.

Forward change of edges

Starting from a standstill or small glide, the skater steps onto a FO edge at a line to create a lobe, as the skater approaches the line again, they will prepare to change their edge and lobe at that axis by ensuring the free foot is in front of the skating foot and the skating side arm is leading. At the axis (line), the skater will shift their lean to the new lobe while moving their free foot behind their skating foot. The new edge will match the symmetry of the 1st edge, and be held until the axis (line). At the line, the skater will push onto the other foot to create a FI edge and prepare for the change by bringing the free foot in front of the skating foot, lead with the free arm and repeat the technique above to perform another change of edge. The skater will then stop and repeat the exercise on the opposite foot on the way back, demonstrating "figure form" throughout.

 

The change of edge should be executed in a manner that sees the skater progressively travel down the ice without “back tracking” or performing an “S” change. There should be clear edges entering and exiting the change of edge to ensure that the change is not diagonal.

 

All 4 forward change of edges must be performed

 

Reasonable:

-          *Solid body lean on 50% +

-          *Pushes from the blade

-          Reasonable control, balance, form and agility

 

 

STAR 5

STAR 5 stroking 1**

(quick edges)

(insert pic)

Starting from forwards skating, the skater will complete a large circle of forward crosscuts at one end of the ice (between blue line and goal line) in either clockwise or counter-clockwise direction with power. Once the skater has completed 1 full circle, they will continue doing crosscuts to reach the corner of the ice where they will begin the 1st exercise of the X pattern. The 1st exercise of the X pattern is a series of quick FI edges executed by the skater transferring their weight by sliding the free foot to the front of their body. There is no “push” in this manoeuvre, as the skater generates the power by using their knee bend and unweighting during each weight transfer. Once at the opposite end of the rink, the skater will perform a 3 turn or Mohawk to repeat the exercise backwards. For the backward inside edges, the skater will transfer their weight by unweighing and taking their free leg off the ice towards the back of their body. Again, the push is generated by the depth and pressure on the edge and the unweighting action during the weight transfer from foot to foot.

 

One full pattern must be performed. **Skater draw for starting direction

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *75% of exercise demonstrating proper pushing technique (fwd and bwds)

-          *Acceleration and knee action

-          Stable for 75% or more of the exercise

STAR 5 stroking 2 (backward slalom)

(insert pic)

Using the X & O pattern and starting from forwards skating, the skater will start the circle portion of this exercise with a FI Mohawk and execute a step-push sequence consisting of:

FI Mohawk, backward crosscut, BO 3-turn, FI Mohawk, backward crosscut, BO 3-turn. The skater will continue this sequence until they reach the exit point to start the diagonal pattern of the X consisting of a backward 1-foot slalom on their foot of choice. At the opposite end of the rink, the skater will perform the FI Mohawk, backward crosscut, BO 3-turn exercise in the opposite direction for a full circle, exiting at the opposite corner to perform a backward 1-foot slalom on the opposite foot.

One full pattern must be performed. Skater may choose starting direction

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *75% of exercise demonstrating proper pushing technique (fwd and bwds)

-          *Acceleration and knee action

-          Stable for 75% or more of the exercise

 

Spiral sequence

 

As defined in the STAR 5 Technical Package for the current year.

 

Two spirals must be performed

 

Reasonable for level:

-          *Body line, 1 spiral per foot hip level or higher

-          *1 spiral must be held 3 seconds or more and other spiral must be held for no less than 2 seconds

-          Reasonable control and edge quality (no straight lines)

 

Content & Training - SKILLS

 

The following has been compiled to give coaches some resources and rationale for skill placement and training strategies in each discipline. Please note that all skills regardless of discipline can be trained on any session. It is not mandatory to segregate disciplines into different sessions. For easy training accessibility, it is recommended to allow skaters to train all areas of the STAR 1-5 program on the same session.

 SKILLS

NOTE: The *practice pattern for the X & O Stroking Exercises is to be skated on full ice. The circle portions are to remain in the same place as the assessment pattern.  Exercises designed for the X portion would be performed along the outside perimeter of the rink. Skaters must practice this pattern in both directions to ensure the forwards and backward circles are trained in both CW (clockwise) and CCW (counter clockwise) directions.

STAR 1 Skills

- is designed to be acquired within 3-9 months of achieving skills in Stage 6 of CanSkate. The success of this goal will largely depend on the quality of skills taught in Stage 5 & 6 as well as the program delivery and frequency in the club’s STAR 1-2 program. STAR 1 skills introduce skaters to basic philosophical foundations of quality skating.

All edges and turns in the Skills Program will be taught in “figure form” to allow skaters to develop an understanding of:

  • Balance point on the blade
  • Controlled body movement
  • A still and strong core
  • Proper turning technique

NOTE: There is no mandatory criteria required for assessment at this level as it is “developmental”. As the entry level, skaters will be encouraged to achieve proper technique. The allowance of “no mandatory criteria” has been identified as skaters will repeat all of these skills in subsequent levels, therefore continuing their development. Coaches are encouraged to include these skills in every day routines, for example: Edge & Turn classes, Warm Up routines, etc. Reaching the GOLD standard of performance whenever possible, is the goal of the STAR 1-5 program.

STAR 1 - Skills

Rationale/progression:

Strategies to train this skill include:

Fwd Edges

These edges will become the foundation for many skills in figure skating including spin entries and dance steps. Teaching a quiet posture with controlled, close movements will encourage good balance and constant lean.

-          Incorporating into edge/turn classes

-          Using a circuit in lesson time

-          Using the goal, blue or red line for axis

Fwd 3-Turns

Adding onto the technique already learned in CanSkate, skater will be taught to extend entry and exit edge length, as well as gather the body into figure form for more control. This skill will continue to be developed throughout the STAR 1-5 program as it is used in many, many other skills.

-          Incorporating into edge/turn classes

-          Using a circuit in lesson time (ensure drawings encourage a 2 second glide in and out of the turn)

FI MoH Turn Sequence

This skill helps instill equality of movement in both directions (agility) and builds on the mohawk taught in CanSkate. Figure form is not expected in this skill.

-          Incorporating into edge/turn classes

-          Using a circuit in lesson time

-          Using the goal, blue or red line for axis

 

STAR 1 Stroking (Basic)

The 1st stroking exercise in the STAR 1-5 program will focus on proper crosscut technique both forwards and backwards, again expanding on technique learned in CanSkate.  Forwards and backwards push-glide sequences are also the focus, concentrating on correct pushing technique.

-          Incorporating into a power class

-          If used in a power class, coaches can choose to have all skaters try all stroking exercises, or have each skater work on the exercise closest to their level of development.

-          Delivering content in a small group format

-          Using the *practice pattern to practice on session without interruption of session flow. If using this pattern, be sure to practice both directions.

Fwd Spiral Circles

This may be the 1st time skaters will be introduced to spirals on an edge. This skill allows skaters to work on balance and flexibility on both feet and edges. Spirals will be a constant in the STAR 1-5 program and should be trained regularly. Skaters are encouraged to work on circles that are larger than hockey circles.

-          Incorporating into a field move or cool down class. Explore ways to work on curves

-          Delivering content in small group format

-          This skill can be trained on a straight line as a progression or challenge, however assessment must be on a circle.

-           

Field Moves

This skill grouping is designed to expose skaters to the range of motion required for some skills in this area. Both the 1-foot sit glide and spread eagle build on the techniques learned in the CanSkate program. The introduction of the Ina Bauer expands on the spread eagle skill set. Be sure to have skaters practice all skills in all directions and on both feet. They will be required to choose one for assessment purposes.

-          Incorporating into a field move or cool down class.

-          Delivering content in small group format

-          These skills can be trained on a straight line as a progression or challenge.

 

STAR 2 Skills 

- introduce skaters to concepts that have not been fully developed at previous levels. Figure form will play a big part in some of these skills.

 NOTE: For every skill, one criteria has been identified as “mandatory”. Coaches need to be familiar with this mandatory criterion as it is necessary to be achieved to reach an overall passing rating for each skill. Be mindful that not all skills need to achieve this rating to pass the entire assessment.

STAR 2 - Skills

Rationale/progression:

Strategies to train this skill include:

Backward Edges

These edges will expand on the BO and BI slalom learned in CanSkate. Coaches will teach the proper pushes required to initiate power from a stand still (c-pushes) as well as the technique needed to step onto a BO or BI edge. Teaching a quiet posture with controlled, close movements will encourage good balance and constant lean.

-          Incorporating into edge/turn classes

-          Using a circuit in lesson time

-          Using the goal, blue or red line for axis

 

 

Backward 3-Turns

This is a new skill for skaters. Building on the forward turning technique and backward edge acquisition, coaches will concentrate on teaching the technique of the turn. This skill will be used in many applications moving forward in the STAR 1-5 program. Teaching a quiet posture with controlled, close movements will encourage good balance and constant lean.

-          Incorporating into edge/turn classes

-          Using a circuit in lesson time (ensure drawings encourage a 2 second glide in and out of the turn)

-          Using solid progressions, assistance and repetition. Skill can have steps leading into entry of the turn to assist skater with flow and momentum.

Forward Circle on Circle

This is a new skill for skaters and is positioned here to expose skaters to the challenge of holding a sustained edge for a 360-degree curve. Coaches will teach the skater to hold a constant, equal lean while maintaining a quiet body to increase flow and edge quality. Proper pushing technique is essential on this skill. Skaters will train this skill in both directions (CW & CCW).

-          Placing multiple skaters on the same circle to practice at the same time. This can be easily done by placing the skaters at the third or quarter marks.

 

2-ft to 1-ft Multi Turns

This skill is a direct progression from the 2-ft multi turns on Stage 6 in CanSkate. Skaters will expand on their knowledge by adding the same action and technique to turning on 1 foot. This is an advanced skill that is being brought to this level for development and exposure purposes. Skaters will need time to develop this technique. The technique learned here will assist the skater in preparation for jump take-offs, brackets and more.

-          Incorporating into an edge/turn or warm up class

-          Delivering content in a small group format

-          Using a circuit in lesson time

FO Turn Sequence

This skill helps instill equality of movement in both directions (agility) and builds on the forward 3-turns taught in STAR 1. Figure form is not expected in this skill. This skill is also used in the STAR 2 Freeskate Program.

-          Incorporating into edge/turn or warm up classes

-          Using a circuit in lesson time

 

STAR 3 Skills 

- builds on skills learned thus far and encourages a greater level of development/performance.

NOTE: For every skill one criteria has been identified as “mandatory”. Coaches need to be familiar with this mandatory criterion as it is necessary to be achieved to reach an overall passing rating for each skill. Be mindful that not all skills need to achieve this rating to pass the entire assessment.

STAR 3 - Skills

Rationale/progression:

Strategies to train this skill include:

STAR 3 Stroking (Power)

This stroking exercise expands on crosscut technique by having the skaters generate power with a different tempo of crosscut. This will encourage power development from full thrusting and pushing technique. This exercise also expands on the 2-ft to 1-ft slalom learned in CanSkate. Skaters will be expected to generate and maintain power and flow through the slalom part of this exercise. Proper knee bend and twisting action will be imperative for success.  This skill should be trained constantly starting at STAR 1 in edge/turn or warm up classes.

-          Incorporating into a power class

-          If used in a power class, coaches can choose to have all skaters try all stroking exercises, or have each skater work on the exercise closest to their level of development.

-          Delivering content in a small group format

-          2-ft to 1-ft slalom may also be incorporated into edge/turn classes as a separate component in a lane or on the perimeter.

-          Using the *practice pattern to practice on session without interruption of session flow. If using this pattern, be sure to practice both directions.

Fwd Spiral Circles

This is the 2nd time skaters will perform this skill for assessment. The level of proficiency is higher than originally introduced at STAR 1.  Skaters should be using a larger circle as well as demonstrate more speed and balance throughout.

-          Incorporating into a field move or cool down class. Explore ways to work on curves

-          Delivering content in small group format

-          This skill can be trained on a straight line as a progression or challenge, however assessment must be on a circle.

Field Moves

This skill grouping is designed to expand on the field moves introduced at STAR 1.  Coaches will need to be mindful of safety strategies when delivering or practicing these skills.  Performance of these skills should demonstrate a higher level of acquisition than STAR 1. Coaches are encouraged to include field moves into regular weekly training for solid development.

-          Incorporating into a field move or cool down class.

-          Delivering content in small group format

-          These skills can be trained on a straight line as a progression or challenge.

-          Training bwd 1-ft sit glides in lanes for safety purposes

-          Training skaters to stay slightly forward on Y-Spiral to activate core and maintain proper balance on blade

 

STAR 4 Skills 

- introduce skaters to concepts that have not been fully developed at previous levels. Figure form will play a big part in some of these skills. 

NOTE: For every skill there are two criteria has been identified as “mandatory”. Coaches need to be familiar with these mandatory criteria as it is necessary to be achieved to reach an overall passing rating for each skill. Be mindful that not all skills need to achieve this rating to pass the entire assessment. The rationale for identifying two criteria is to ensure the quality development expected at this level is achieved.

STAR 4 - Skills

Rationale/progression:

Strategies to train this skill include:

Forward Brackets

This is a new skill for skaters. Building on the 2-ft to 1-ft multi turn technique, coaches will concentrate on teaching the technique of the bracket action. Technique for this skill will see skaters face outside the circle and turn away from the center while maintaining a solid lean toward the inside of the circle. This skill will be used in many applications moving forward in the STAR 1-5 program. Teaching a quiet posture with controlled, close movements will encourage good balance and constant lean. Coaches are encouraged to keep the 1-foot multi turns incorporated into warm up or edge/turn classes throughout the STAR 1-5 program. 

-          Using stationary 1-ft scissor exercises

-          Incorporating into edge/turn classes

-          Using drawings on ice to show skaters length of edge and direction of turn

-          Using solid progressions, assistance and repetition. Skill can have steps leading into entry of the turn to assist skater with flow and momentum.

 

Backward Brackets

This is a new skill for skaters. Building on the 2-ft to 1-ft multi turn technique, coaches will concentrate on teaching the technique of the bracket action. Technique for this skill will see skaters face inside the circle and turn away from the center while maintaining a solid lean toward the inside of the circle. This skill will be used in many applications moving forward in the STAR 1-5 program. Teaching a quiet posture with controlled, close movements will encourage good balance and constant lean. Coaches are encouraged to keep the 1-foot multi turns incorporated into warm up or edge/turn classes throughout the STAR 1-5 program.

-          Using stationary 1-ft scissor exercises

-          Incorporating into edge/turn classes

-          Using drawings on ice to show skaters length of edge and direction of turn

-          Using solid progressions, assistance and repetition. Skill can have steps leading into entry of the turn to assist skater with flow and momentum.

 

Forward Double Threes

Building on both the forward and backward 3-turn technique, skaters will now combine both turns on the same lobe. This is a great skill to expand on control, rotational axis and edge quality.

-          Incorporating into edge/turn classes

-          Using drawings on ice to show skaters length of edge and lobe size

-          Using solid progressions, assistance and repetition. Skill can have steps leading into entry of the turn to assist skater with flow and momentum.

Backward Circle on Circle

Building on the forward circle on circle concept, coaches will teach skaters this skill backwards.  This skill will emphasize the ability to hold a constant, equal lean while maintaining a quiet body to increase flow and edge quality. Proper pushing technique is essential on this skill. Coaches will be able to expand on backward pushing technique by focussing on the proper step down edge is executed quickly and correctly. Skaters will train this skill in both directions (CW & CCW).

-          Placing multiple skaters on the same circle to practice at the same time. This can be easily done by placing the skaters at the third or quarter marks.

 

Forward Changes of Edge

At this level of development, it is quite probable that skaters have been introduced to change of edges in dance (Baby Blues or Fiesta). Skaters have also been performing change of edges in the 1-ft slaloms. This exercise allows coaches to teach the finer points of edge changes on both feet and both edges. Using figure form, skaters will be encouraged to focus on balance point, lean and symmetry of edges.

-          Incorporating into edge/turn classes

-          Using drawings on ice to show skaters length of edge and lobe size

-          Using the goal, blue or red line for axis. Can have several skaters on the line at the same time.

 

STAR 5 Skills 

- builds on skills learned thus far and encourages a greater level of development/performance.

 NOTE: For every skill there are two criteria has been identified as “mandatory”. Coaches need to be familiar with these mandatory criteria as it is necessary to be achieved to reach an overall passing rating for each skill. Be mindful that not all skills need to achieve this rating to pass the entire assessment. The rationale for identifying two criteria is to ensure the quality development expected at this level is achieved.

STAR 5 - Skills

Rationale/progression:

Strategies to train this skill include:

STAR 5 Stroking 1 (Quick Edges)

This stroking exercise pushes the development of power on the crosscuts. Skater’s technique for pushing should be solidified at this level. The introduction of quick edges expands on the concepts introduced in the slalom exercises by encouraging the skaters to generate speed without the aid of a push. Skaters will need to use their knee and ankle bend to apply pressure onto the edge, as well as their unweighting action during the transfer of weight when changing feet, to maintain and generate speed and power. This is an evolved skill from the down-up-down required in the execution of the 1-ft slaloms. The natural upper body twisting action from the slaloms will also be required to perform this skill well.

-          Incorporating into a power class

-          If used in a power class, coaches can choose to have all skaters try all stroking exercises, or have each skater work on the exercise closest to their level of development.

-          Delivering content in a small group format

-          Quick forward and backward inside edges may also be incorporated into edge/turn classes as a separate component in a lane or on the perimeter.

-          Using the *practice pattern to practice on session without interruption of session flow. If using this pattern, be sure to practice both directions.

STAR 5 Stroking 2 (Bwd Slalom)

This stroking exercise includes many skills previously taught.  The crosscut circles introduce skaters to a rotational axis readiness exercise that will become very helpful to skaters as they progress in their freeskate. It also allows skaters to use their gained skills to create and maintain power and flow. The backward slalom for this exercise should be introduced at an earlier level of development in class or lesson format to allow skaters more time to acquire this technique.  

-          Incorporating into a power class

-          If used in a power class, coaches can choose to have all skaters try all stroking exercises, or have each skater work on the exercise closest to their level of development.

-          Delivering content in a small group format

-          Backward 1-ft slalom may also be incorporated into edge/turn classes as a separate component in a lane or on the perimeter.

-          Using the *practice pattern to practice on session without interruption of session flow. If using this pattern, be sure to practice both directions.

-          The BO-3-turn component may also be trained separately in a lane (alternate directions) or on a circle in class or lesson format.

Spiral Sequence

This skill derives from the requirements identified in the freeskate program events at this level. Coaches will help the skaters construct a spiral sequence as per the requirements of the current technical package. The level of performance should be identified at a higher acquisition expectation than performed at STAR 3.

-          Incorporating into a field move or cool down class. Explore ways to work on curves in a class format.

-          Delivering content in small group format

-          This skill can be trained on a straight line as a progression or challenge, however assessment must see spirals performed on edges.

 

Descriptions and Standards DANCE

 

Criteria

Advance Stages of Development

Moderate Stages of Development

Early Stages of Development

Technique:

Proper mechanics demonstrated (Steps, pushes, knee action,

·  Pushes from side of blade

·  Equal thrust on both feet in crosscuts

·   Correct knee action

·  Generally, pushes from side of blade

·  One dominant thrust may be evident

·    Some knee bend evident

·  Thrust technique not properly executed

·  Little knee bend – stroking choppy

·     Some toe-pushing may be evident

Execution:

 Balance control and depth of edges

·  Skates on true edges

·  Strong body lean demonstrated

Skater has consistent balance

·  Edges of moderate quality

·  Some body lean demonstrated

Generally balanced

·  Weak edges and wobbles

·  Little to no body lean demonstrated

Balance inconsistent or weak

Carriage:

Style, body line, posture

·  The skater has comfortable upright carriage and good form

·  Demonstrates strong core

·  Body positions are generally pleasing

·  The skater has reasonable form and generally upright carriage

·  Moderate core strength

·    Body positions have moderate extension

·  Form weak with weaknesses observed in carriage

·  Skater lacks core strength

·     Body positions are not fully extended

Timing:

Ability to match the musical timing

·  The skater matches his/her pace to the pace of the music

 

·  The skater may only demonstrate a connection to the pace of the music for brief moments

 

·  The skater does not match his/her pace at all to the pace of the music

 

 

 

 

 

DANCE

Skill

Description

Minimum Performance Standard

STAR 1

Forward Progressives

 

A forward progressive is a dance step that is executed by the skater performing a blade push onto an outside edge, fully extending the free leg at a 30-degree angle (approx.), and allowing the free foot to pass the skating foot and step down on an inside edge without crossing into the circle. The foot that was on the outside edge then executes a forward thrust from the outside edge by pushing under the skating foot and outside of the lobe using the side of the blade, until it is fully extended. The free foot then comes back to the skating foot to start the next step.

 

To introduce skaters to this new step, the skaters will repeat the 2 step sequence described above around a circle (approximate size of a hockey circle) until they have completed a full circle in one direction. The skater will then perform forward progressives on the circle in the opposite direction. The skater’s upper body should be rotated towards the center of the circle with a strong core position. Arms should be extended and placed over the circle.

1 full circle of clockwise (CW) and counter clockwise (CCW) progressives must be performed.

 

Reasonable for level:

- 75% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

Forward Chasses

 

A forward chasse is a dance step that is executed by the skater performing a blade push onto an outside edge, fully extending the free leg at a 30-degree angle (approx.), and then bringing the free foot to step beside the skating foot to allow the inside foot to rise off the ice slightly with the blade parallel to the ice. The free foot then comes back to the skating foot to start the next step

 

To introduce skaters to this new step, the skaters will repeat the 2 step sequence described above around a circle (approximate size of a hockey circle) until they have completed a full circle in one direction. The skater will then perform forward chasses on the circle in the opposite direction. The skater’s upper body should be rotated towards the center of the circle with a strong core position. Arms should be extended and placed over the circle.

 

1 full circle of clockwise (CW) and counter clockwise (CCW) chasses must be performed.

 

Reasonable for level:

- 75% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

Forward Slide Chasses

 

A forward slide chasse is a dance step that is executed by the skater performing a blade push onto an outside edge, fully extending the free leg at a 30-degree angle (approx.), and then bringing the free foot to step beside the skating foot to allow the inside foot to slide forward off the ice, reaching a fully extended position.  The free foot then comes back to the skating foot to start the next step.

 

To introduce skaters to this new step, the skaters will repeat the 2 step sequence described above around a circle (approximate size of a hockey circle) until they have completed a full circle in one direction. The skater will then perform forward slide chasses on the circle in the opposite direction. The skater’s upper body should be rotated towards the center of the circle with a strong core position. Arms should be extended and placed over the circle.

1 full circle of clockwise (CW) and counter clockwise (CCW) slide chasses must be performed

 

Reasonable for level:

- 75% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

Forward Outside Swing Roll Sequence

 

A forward swing roll is similar to a forward outside edge. To execute a forward swing roll, the skater will use a blade push to push onto a forward outside edge on a bent skating knee, fully extending the free leg at a 30-degree angle behind. As the skater reaches the middle of the edge/roll, they will rise up on the knee as they bring their free leg to extend to the front. The roll is finished by bringing the feet together before performing the next step

 

To introduce skaters to this new step, the skaters will repeat the process listed above on a line using the width of the ice. The skater may start from a standstill or from forward skating and may choose starting foot. The skater will perform a series of forward swing rolls across the width of the ice.

Minimum of 4 swing rolls must be performed (2 on each foot)

 

Reasonable for level:

- 75% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

FO Cross Roll

 

FO cross rolls can be initiated from either a RFO or LFO edge.  The free foot is extended behind the skater and internally rotates as it crosses the path of the skating foot to step on an outside edge.  To ensure the proper edge is achieved, the free foot may cross in front at a right angle to the skating foot. Once the weight is transferred to the other foot, the free leg is extended again.

For this skill, have the skater do each cross roll in isolation as it is an introductory skill at this level.

2 cross rolls performed on each foot.

 

Reasonable for level:

- 75% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level


STAR 2a

Criteria with an asterisk (*) mandatory for a pass

Dutch Waltz

 

The skater will perform the pattern dance of the Dutch Waltz solo, shadowed or partnered by a coach or PA. Approved music must be used from either the Skate Canada Dance Series Music or the Skate Canada Contemporary Dance Music List.

A maximum of 7 introductory steps may be used by the skater to build speed and flow to reach Step #1 of the dance. To ensure your skater is reaching step #1 at the correct time in the music, count the waltz beats (1,2,3,4,5,6). The 1st step of the dance must fall on the “downbeat” also known as the “strong” beat of the music. When you are counting, this beat will be count #1.

 

The skater must perform a minimum of 2 complete dance patterns.

 

Please note: To facilitate stronger skater development, solo or shadowed dances are preferred at this level.

 

 

 

Focus Area #1:  Steps 1,2 & 3

Skaters are expected to perform the progressive correctly (without crossover) on a strong curve with upright carriage.

Focus Area #2: Steps 4 & 5

Skaters are expected to perform the Swing Rolls on strong, bold curves with good free leg extension. There should be an evident rise in the skating knee on both lobes.

Focus Area #3: Steps 9 & 10

Skaters are expected to perform steps 9 & 10 as a proper progressive with the free leg on step 10 extending under and back.

The skater must have 100% accuracy to receive credit for these areas.

 

A min 2 out of 3 successful Focus Areas are needed to pass the dance. 

 

Full Pattern: Timing*

Skaters are expected to demonstrate a good understanding of timing throughout the dance.

*Minimum of:

-          75% of the dance on correct timing

 

Full Pattern: Carriage

Skaters are expected to carry themselves with good posture. The body and head should strive to be tall and extended with soft knees and good free leg extension. Arms should be held in a controlled, relaxed manner and may move with the body to assist with lean and curve.

-          Reasonable body carriage and extension for level

-          Reasonable depth of edges, control for the majority of the dance

 

Full Pattern: Technique

Skaters are expected to demonstrate proper blade pushes and proper steps with a solid knee action.

-          75% of correct steps

-          75 % blade pushes

-          Some knee action evident throughout

 

 

STAR 2a - Dutch Waltz Pattern Dance

Suggested Introductory Steps:

Two straight steps, LF of three beats, and RF of three beats.

 

The dance starts in one corner of the rink, progressing down the side and across the end where it repeats down the other side and across the end to the start; thus requiring two sequences of the dance for one round of the rink.

 

The dance is skated to slow, deliberate waltz music and consists mostly of progressive sequences interspersed with long rolling edges. It thus allows beginners to devote their attention to getting the feel of the music instead of worrying about complicated steps, and allows them to enjoy rhythmical motion in their skating.

 

Upright position, good carriage, and easy flow without too much effort are desired in the dance.


 

Music

Tempo

Pattern

·         Waltz ¾

·         46 measures of 3 beats

·         138 beats per minute

 

·         Set

Inventor

First Performed

George Muller

Colorado Springs, 1948 


 

Hold (optional)

Step No.

Step
(same for both)

# of beats

 

Kilian

LFO 

Focus Area #1

 RFI-Pr 

LFO  

 RFO-SwR 

Focus Area #2

 LFO- SwR 

RFO  

 

 LFI-Pr 

 

 RFO 

 

 LFO 

Focus Area #3

10

 RFI-Pr 

11 

 LFO 

 

12 

 RFI-Pr 

 

13 

LFO 

 

14 

 RFO- SwR 

 

15 

LFO  

 

16 

 RFI-Pr 

 

 

 

STAR 2b

Canasta Tango

The skater will perform the pattern dance of the Canasta Tango solo, shadowed or partnered by a coach or PA. Approved music must be used from either the Skate Canada Dance Series Music or the Skate Canada Contemporary Dance Music List.

A maximum of 7 introductory steps may be used by the skater to build speed and flow to reach Step #1 of the dance. To ensure your skater is reaching step #1 at the correct time in the music, count the tango beats (1,2,3,4). The 1st step of the dance must fall on the “downbeat” also known as the “strong” beat of the music. When you are counting, this beat will be count #1.

 

The skater must perform a minimum of 2 complete dance patterns.

 

Please note: To facilitate stronger skater development, solo or shadowed dances are preferred at this level.

 

OPTIONAL STEPS: #14 may be skated as a cross roll

 

 

 

Focus Area #1: Steps 2,3 & 4

Skaters should demonstrate a strong curve with proper progressive – chasse technique.

Focus Area #2: Steps 6 & 7

Skaters should demonstrate strong blade push followed by a fully extended free foot on the slide.

Focus Area #3: Steps 9 & 10

Skaters should demonstrate strong blade push followed by a fully extended free foot on the slide.

 

The skater must have 100% accuracy to receive credit for these areas.

 

A min 2 out of 3 successful Focus Areas are needed to pass the dance. 

 

Full Pattern: Timing*

Skaters are expected to demonstrate a good understanding of timing throughout the dance.

Minimum of:

-          75% of the dance on correct timing

 

Full Pattern: Carriage

Skaters are expected to carry themselves with good posture. The body and head should strive to be tall and extended with soft knees and good free leg extension. Arms should be held in a controlled, relaxed manner and may move with the body to assist with lean and curve.

-          Reasonable body carriage and extension for level

-          Reasonable depth of edges, control for the majority of the dance

 

Full Pattern: Technique

Skaters are expected to demonstrate proper blade pushes and proper steps with a solid knee action.

-          75% of correct steps

-          75 % blade pushes

-          Some knee action evident throughout

 

STAR 2b – Canasta Tango Pattern Dance

 

 

Suggested Introductory Steps:

RFO (2), LFO (2), RFI (4)

 

This is a very simple dance that introduces the skater to a tango rhythm while giving them experience on large lobes to increase their confidence and speed.

The first chasse (steps 3 and 4) is done with both feet side by side on count 4; be sure to transfer the weight to the right foot though - do not skate on both feet at the same time. The other chasse is slightly different; it is called a slide chasse. As the weight is transferred to the new skating foot, the free foot slides off the ice in front of the skater, returning close beside the skating foot just in time for a smooth transition to the next edge. Judicious use of knee action on these edges can do a great deal to help the tango expression. Here, too, is a good place for the beginner to practice extending the free leg as straight as possible, and pointing the toe down, not up. The skater should watch that steps 9-13 are skated on a good edge so that step 14 RFO can be aimed somewhat toward the center of the rink, and so placed accurately as shown on the diagram.

This step (14) may be started, optionally, with a cross roll in which the right foot crosses in front of the left foot at the end of step 13 and the push onto the RFO is made from outside of the left foot. An effort should be made to keep the feet fairly close together at the start of the transition, but it is of utmost importance that a toe push be avoided.

Neat footwork, tango expression and good carriage should be maintained throughout the dance.

Music

Tempo

Pattern

·         Tango 4/4

·         26 measures of 4 beats

·         104 beats per minute

 

·         Set

Inventor

First Performed

James B Francis

The University Skating Club, Toronto - 1951

Reverse Kilian

 

 1 

LFO 

1

Segment #1

Focus Area #1

RFI-Pr 

1

LFO 

1

RFI-Ch 

1

Focus Area #2

 

LFO- SwR 

4

RFO 

2

Focus Area #2

LFI-SlCh 

2

 

RFO- SwR 

4

 

LFO 

2

Focus Area #3

10 

RFI-SlCh 

2

11 

LFO 

1

 

12 

RFI-Pr 

1

 

13 

LFO 

2

 

14

RFO- SwR*

4

 

*Optionally CR-RFO

 

 

 

 1 

LFO 

1

Segment #1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STAR 3a

Baby Blues

The skater will perform the pattern dance of the Baby Blues solo, shadowed or partnered by a coach or PA. Approved music must be used from either the Skate Canada Dance Series Music or the Skate Canada Contemporary Dance Music List.

A maximum of 7 introductory steps may be used by the skater to build speed and flow to reach Step #1 of the dance. To ensure your skater is reaching step #1 at the correct time in the music, count the blues beats (1,2,3,4). The 1st step of the dance must fall on the “downbeat” also known as the “strong” beat of the music. When you are counting, this beat will be count #1.

 

The skater must perform a minimum of 2 complete dance patterns.

 

Please note: To facilitate stronger skater development, solo or shadowed dances are preferred at this level.

 

 

 

Focus Area #1: Steps 1, 2 & 3

Skaters are expected to perform proper progressive technique with blade pushes and good free leg extension on steps 1 & 2. Step 3 should demonstrate a solid inside edge with lean change and externally rotated free foot.

Focus Area #2: Step 7

On this step the free leg will start behind for 1 beat and move in front for 1 beat while on the outside edge, executing a swing roll action. The free leg will then swing back to execute a change of edge. The FI edge will be held for 2 beats with the free leg externally rotated and skating knee bent.

Focus Area #3: Steps 11, 12, & 13

Skaters are expected to demonstrate a definite outside to outside lobe change on steps 11 & 12 with proper blade push and cross roll technique. Step #13 should demonstrate proper progressive technique with free leg extending under and back.

The skater must have 100% accuracy to receive credit for these areas.

 

A min 2 out of 3 successful Focus Areas are needed to pass the dance. 

 

Full Pattern: Timing*

Skaters are expected to demonstrate a good understanding of timing throughout the dance.

Minimum of:

-          75% of the dance on correct timing

 

Full Pattern: Carriage

Skaters are expected to carry themselves with good posture. The body and head should strive to be tall and extended with soft knees and good free leg extension. Arms should be held in a controlled, relaxed manner and may move with the body to assist with lean and curve.

-          Reasonable body carriage and extension for level

-          Reasonable depth of edges, control for the majority of the dance

 

Full Pattern: Technique*

Skaters are expected to demonstrate proper blade pushes and proper steps with a solid knee action.

-          75% of correct steps

-          75 % blade pushes

-          Some knee action evident throughout

 

 

 

STAR 3a – Baby Blues Pattern Dance

 

Suggested Introductory Steps:

LFO (2) RFO (2) LFO Swing Roll (4)

The dance starts in one corner of the rink facing the centre of the ice, progressing down the side across the end and around the corner where it repeats, thus requiring two sequences of the dance for one round of the rink.

The dance consists mainly of two beat progressive sequences. Step 7 (RFOI) and Step 14 (LFO- SwR) are the only 4 beat edges. The free leg swing forward and back on Step 7 is executed as follows: forward on count 2 and back on count 3.

The simple steps allow beginners to get the feel of the music and enjoy rhythmical motion in their skating. Because of the use of slow Blues music, this dance promotes the use of long edges.

Upright position, good carriage and easy flow without too much effort are desired in the dance. The presence of a soft knee action throughout the dance is desired.


 

Music

Tempo

Pattern

·         Blues 4/4

·         22 measures of 4 beats

·         88 beats per minute

 

·         Set

Inventor

First Performed

Unknown

Unknown

 

 

Hold (optional)

Step No.

Step
(same for both)

# of beats

 

Kilian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RFO 

2

Segment #1

LFI-Pr 

2

Focus Area #1

RFI 

2

LFO 

2

 

RFI-Pr 

2

 

LFI 

2

 

RFOI-Sw 

2+2

Focus Area #2

LFO 

2

 

RFI-Pr 

2

 

10 

LFI 

2

 

11 

RFO 

2

Focus Area #3

12 

CR-LFO 

2

13 

RFI-Pr 

2

14 

LFO- SwR 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 


STAR 3b

Backward Progressives

 

A backward progressive is a dance step that is executed by the skater performing a backward blade push onto an outside edge, fully extending the free leg to the front of their body and allowing the free foot to pass the skating foot and step down on an inside edge without crossing behind into the circle. The foot that was on the outside edge then executes a backward thrust from the outside edge by pushing forward, with the foot slight turned into the centre of the circle, until it is fully extended. The free foot then comes back to the skating foot to start the next step.

 

To introduce skaters to this new step, the skaters will repeat the 2 step sequence described above around a circle (approximate size of a hockey circle) until they have completed a full circle in one direction. The skater will then perform backward progressives on the circle in the opposite direction. The skater’s upper body should be rotated towards the center of the circle with a strong core position. Arms should be extended and placed over the circle.

1 full circle of clockwise (CW) and counter clockwise (CCW) progressives must be performed.

 

Minimum of:

- 75% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

Backward Chasses

 

A backward chasse is a dance step that is executed by the skater performing a blade push onto an outside edge, fully extending the free leg to the front of their body and then bringing the free foot to step beside the skating foot to allow the inside foot to rise off the ice with the blade parallel to the ice. The free foot then comes back to the skating foot to start the next step.

 

To introduce skaters to this new step, the skaters will repeat the 2 step sequence described above around a circle (approximate size of a hockey circle) until they have completed a full circle in one direction. The skater will then perform backward chasses on the circle in the opposite direction. The skater’s upper body should be rotated towards the center of the circle with a strong core position. Arms should be extended and placed over the circle.

 

1 full circle of clockwise (CW) and counter clockwise (CCW) chasses must be performed.

Minimum of:

- 75% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

Backward Swing Roll Sequence

 

A backward swing roll is similar to a backward outside edge. To execute a backward swing roll, the skater will use a “C”-type push to push onto a backward outside edge on a bent skating knee, fully extending the free leg to the front. As the skater reaches the middle of the edge/roll, they will rise up on the knee as they bring their free leg to extend behind them at an approximate 30-degree angle. The roll is finished by bringing the feet together before performing the next step

 

To introduce skaters to this new step, the skaters will repeat the process listed above on a line using the width of the ice. The skater may start from a standstill or from forward skating and may choose starting foot. The skater will perform a series of forward swing rolls across the width of the ice.

Minimum of 4 swing rolls must be performed (2 on each foot)

Minimum of:

- 75% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

Forward Inside Open MoHawks

 

SWING: The forward inside open Mohawk for the Swing Dance is executed on a RFI edge with full extension of the free foot held behind the skater. The skater will then bring the heel of the free foot to the instep area (instep to heel) of the skating foot before transferring the weight onto a LBI edge with the right free leg then fully extending behind the skater. The timing for this Mohawk is 2 beats on the RFI edge and 2 beats on the LBI edge.

 

FIESTA: The forward inside open Mohawk for the Fiesta Tango is executed on a RFI edge with full extension of the free foot held behind the skater. The skater will then bring the heel of the free foot to the instep area (instep to heel) of the skating foot before transferring the weight onto a LBI edge with the right free leg then staying close to the skating leg in preparation for the next step which would be a RBO edge. The timing for this Mohawk is 1 beat on the RFI edge and 1 beats on the LBI edge.

Must do each type of Mohawk

Minimum of:

- 75% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

RFO Cross Roll, Cross Behind

 

The RFO cross roll, cross behind is executed from a LFO edge.  The free foot is extended behind the skater and internally rotates as it crosses the path of the skating foot to step on an outside edge.  To ensure the proper edge is achieved, the free foot may cross in front at a right angle to the skating foot. Once the weight is transferred to the right foot, the left foot can either be extended behind or raised up behind the skating leg to be brought back in to step on a LFI edge. This cross behind should be tight (feet close together). While on the LFI edge, the right foot should be fully extended in front of the skater.

Only 1 required.

Minimum of:

- 75% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

FO 3-Turn/BO edge

 

The forward 3-turn/BO edge is executed by a FO edge on either foot with the free foot fully extended behind the skater on a bent skating knee. The skater will rise up on the skating knee as they bring their free foot to the skating foot while performing the 3-turn. The feet will remain close together as the skater transfers their weight to the BO edge of the free foot. Once the weight is transferred the free foot will then fully extend forward.  The skater will perform both FO 3-turns (LFO 3-turn, RBO edge + RFO 3-turn, LFO edge).

 

Must do each FO 3-turn (RFO & LFO) 

Minimum of:

- 75% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level


 

STAR 4a

Swing Dance

The skater will perform the pattern dance of the Swing Dance solo, shadowed or partnered by a coach or PA. Approved music must be used from either the Skate Canada Dance Series Music or the Skate Canada Contemporary Dance Music List.

A maximum of 7 introductory steps may be used by the skater to build speed and flow to reach Step #1 of the dance. To ensure your skater is reaching step #1 at the correct time in the music, count the foxtrot beats (1,2,3,4). The 1st step of the dance must fall on the “downbeat” also known as the “strong” beat of the music. When you are counting, this beat will be count #1.

 

The skater must perform a minimum of 2 complete dance patterns.

 

Optional Steps: #12 or #27 may be skated as a progressive or slide chasse.

 

 

 

Focus Area #1: Steps 1-6 & Steps 16 - 21

Skaters are expected to demonstrate strong curves in both directions with solid chasse technique.

Focus Area #2: Steps 22 & 23

Skaters are expected to demonstrate proper backward pushes and knee action on the swing rolls. Strong curves should be evident.

Focus Area #3: Steps 11-13

Solid open Mohawk technique should be evident with good free leg extension and neat feet.

The skater must have 100% accuracy to receive credit for these areas.

 

A min 2 out of 3 successful Focus Areas are needed to pass the dance. 

 

Full Pattern: Timing*

Skaters are expected to demonstrate a good understanding of timing throughout the dance.

Minimum of:

-          75% of the dance on correct timing

 

Full Pattern: Carriage

Skaters are expected to carry themselves with good posture. The body and head should strive to be tall and extended with soft knees and good free leg extension.

-          Reasonable body carriage and extension for level

-          Reasonable depth of edges, control for the majority of the dance

 

Full Pattern: Technique*

Skaters are expected to demonstrate proper blade pushes and proper steps with a solid knee action.

-          75% of correct steps

-          75 % blade pushes

-          Some knee action evident throughout

 


 

STAR 4a – Swing Pattern Dance

 

Suggested Introductory Steps:

Two sets of introductory steps are suggested for this dance (A) using a mohawk, and (B) using a three.

(A) Man: RFO (2), LFI (2), RFO (4)
Woman: LFI (2), OpMo RBI (2), LBO (4)

(B) Man: RFO (2), LFO (2), RFO (1), LFI (1), RFO (2)
Woman: RFO (2), LFO (2), RFO3 (2), LBO (2)

In both of these examples, the woman will start to the left of the man (in hand-in-hand hold) if the dance is executed with a partner.      

Music

Tempo

Pattern

·         Foxtrot 4/4

·         24 measures of 4 beats

·         96 beats per minute

 

·         Set

Inventor

First Performed

Hubert Sprott

Unknown

                     

Hold (optional)

Step No.

Male Steps

# of beats

Female Steps

 

Closed

 

LFO 

RBO

Focus Area #1

RFI-Ch

LBI-Ch

LFO 

RBO

RFO 

LBO

LFI-Ch 

RBI-Ch

RFO 

LBO

LFO- SwR 

RBO- SwR

 

RFO- SwR 

LBO- SwR

 

Hand-in-hand  

 

LFO 

RBO

 

10 

RFI-Pr 

LFO

 

11 

LFO 

RFI-Pr

Focus Area #3

12

RFI-Pr

*LFO

 

OpMo

 

 

Closed

 

13 

LBI 

*RFI-Pr 

14 

RBO  

LFO 

 

15 

LBO-SwR 

RFO-SwR 

 

16 

RBO  

LFO 

Focus Area #1

17 

LBI-Ch 

RFI-Ch 

18 

RBO 

LFO  

19 

LBO 

RFO 

20 

RBI-Ch 

LFI-Ch  

21 

LBO  

RFO 

22 

RBO- SwR 

LFO- SwR

Focus Area #2

23 

LBO- SwR 

RFO- SwR

 

Hand-in-hand

 

24 

RBO 

LFO

 

25 

LFO 

RFI-Pr

 

26 

RFI-Pr 

LFO

 

27

*LFO

RFI-Pr

 

 

 

 

OpMo

 

Closed

 

 

28 

*RFI-Pr 

LBI

 

29 

LFO

RBO

 

30 

RFO- SwR 

LBO- SwR

 

*LFO, RFI progressive step optionally a slide chasse

                                                                       

This is a dance designated for beginners consisting of all basic edges, forward and backward. It presents a relaxed method of changing from forward to backward skating, requires the man to learn to lead while skating backward as well as forward, makes the steps of each skater identical, even though similar steps are not skated at the same time, and makes it possible for two women to learn to dance or practice it as a couple.

The dance is skated down the length of the rink and contains four curvatures or lobes, and is skated in closed hold if partnered. The one skating forward during the first set of lobes in the straightaway will be skating backward when these four lobes are skated on the opposite side of the rink.

The chasse sequences apply to both forward and backward skating. First step of the sequence is an outside edge of one beat. Second step is an inside edge of one beat, during which the free foot is lifted slightly from the ice and is not allowed to move to a position either in front of or behind the skater, but should be held directly beneath the skater in readiness to accept the skater's weight at the start of the third step. The third step is an outside edge of two beats. At the end of the second beat, the skaters must change of edge slightly in order to stroke smoothly into the next edge or lean.

The third and fourth lobes of the straightaway consist of two four-beat swing rolls that are skated as in the Fourteenstep, but must be skated in each direction.

The end sequences consist of seven steps at each end of the rink. Each step of the sequence is held for two full beats except the last step (steps 15 and 30) which is a swing roll of four beats. Skate the end steps with soft knee action, be relaxed, and try to give the appearance of having fun.

TIPS for partnering (optional)

Step 9 or 24:
The person skating backward releases his or her left hand and curves his edge away from the partner in order to be in position to step forward on the next step.

Step 10 or 25:
Both skate forward. Skater to the left is the one who has just stepped from backward to forward. Hold nearest hand, but do not crowd each other.

Step 11 or 26:
Both still skate forward. Skater to right skates slightly faster than his partner.

Step 12 or 27:
Both still skate forward. Skater to the right should now be slightly in advance of skater to left, and should be ready to skate a RFI open mohawk. At the same time, the skater to the left has the option of either skating a LFO, RFI progressive or a LFO, RFI slide chasse, in which case the free foot slides off the ice in front of the skater to match the partner’s back extension.

Forward inside open mohawk is required. The balance and control must be good, and the execution pleasing to watch.

Step 13 or 28:
The person to the right skates a RFI mohawk and finishes the mohawk in front of the partner.

Step 14 or 29:
Skater who did the mohawk is now skating backward directly in front of the partner.

Step 15 or 30:
Change curvature and skate four beat swing roll in closed position.

The dance positions are closed hold when skating the lengths of the rink and hand-in-hand position at end sequences to allow both skaters to skate forward on steps 10, 11, 12 or 25, 26, 27. Separate by at least twenty-four inches (24") and hold arms relaxed. Appearance of arms during end sequences up to step 14 or 29 is left to discretion of skaters. Assume closed position in time for step 15 or 30.

 

 

STAR 4b

Fiesta Tango

The skater will perform the pattern dance of the Fiesta Tango solo, shadowed or partnered by a coach or PA. Approved music must be used from either the Skate Canada Dance Series Music or the Skate Canada Contemporary Dance Music List.

A maximum of 7 introductory steps may be used by the skater to build speed and flow to reach Step #1 of the dance. To ensure your skater is reaching step #1 at the correct time in the music, count the tango beats (1,2,3,4). The 1st step of the dance must fall on the “downbeat” also known as the “strong” beat of the music. When you are counting, this beat will be count #1.

 

The skater must perform a minimum of 2 complete dance patterns.

 

 

 

 

 

Focus Area #1: Steps 5, 6 & 7

Skaters will be expected to execute a proper cross roll with a blade push and definite outside to outside edge lobe change. The cross behind should have neat feet with a tight cross. Free leg position optional.

Focus Area #2: Step 8

On this step the free leg will start behind for 2 beats and move in front for 2 beats while on the outside edge, executing a swing roll action. The free leg will then swing back to execute a change of edge. The FI edge will be held for 2 beats with the free leg externally rotated and skating knee bent.

Focus Area #3: Steps 10, 11 & 12

Solid open Mohawk technique should be evident with neat feet. BO edge should be stable with a solid knee bend and good free leg extension to the front.

 

The skater must have 100% accuracy to receive credit for these areas.

 

A min 2 out of 3 successful Focus Areas are needed to pass the dance. 

 

Full Pattern: Timing*

Skaters are expected to demonstrate a good understanding of timing throughout the dance.

Minimum of:

-          75% of the dance on correct timing

 

Full Pattern: Carriage

Skaters are expected to carry themselves with good posture. The body and head should strive to be tall and extended with soft knees and good free leg extension.

-          Reasonable body carriage and extension for level

-          Reasonable depth of edges, control for the majority of the dance

 

Full Pattern: Technique*

Skaters are expected to demonstrate proper blade pushes and proper steps with a solid knee action.

-          75% of correct steps

-          75 % blade pushes

-          Some knee action evident throughout

 

 

STAR 4b – Fiesta Tango Pattern Dance

 

Suggested Introductory Steps:

RFO (2), LFO (2), RFI (4) for both skaters if partnered.

 

For partnering, the dance starts in reverse Kilian hold. At steps 10 and 11, partners change to Kilian hold while executing the open mohawk. Steps 11 to 15 are danced in Kilian hold, and as partners change from backward to forward skating at step 16, they take reverse Kilian hold again to start the dance sequence over. The woman should be a little ahead of the man at the beginning of step 9 (LFO) to avoid interference at the open mohawk.

 

The tempo of the Fiesta is slow, tango rhythm, and skaters should strive for upright carriage, soft knee action, easy flow, and smooth leg swings. Step 8 allows for a very pleasing interpretation. The skating knee is well bent at the beginning of the stroke. At the count of three, the free leg swings forward, the change of edge is executed with the full swing of the free leg at the end of count four, and then the free leg swings back at the count of one of the next measure. If preferred, the free leg may remain in front after the change of edge. The use of the free leg on step 8 can add a great deal to the character of the dance, but, however it is used, the change of edge must be executed on the correct beat as shown in the diagram.

The sequence of steps allows for easy, rhythmical movements and partners should be able to interpret the music and skate the steps in a very pleasing tango style.

Music

Tempo

Pattern

·         Tango 4/4

·         27 measures of 4 beats

·         108 beats per minute

 

·         Set

Inventor

First Performed

George Muller

Colorado Springs, 1948

 

 

 

Hold (optional)

Step No.

Step
(same for both)

# of beats

 

Reverse Kilian

 

LFO 

2

 

RFO 

2

 

LFO 

1

 

RFI-Pr 

1

 

LFO 

2

Focus Area #1

CR-RFO 

2

XB-LFI 

2

RFOI 

4 + 2

Focus Area #2

LFO 

2

 

10 

RFI 

1

Focus Area #3

 

OpMo

 

Kilian 

 11

 LBI 

1

12 

RBO 

2

13 

LBI 

2

 

14 

RBO 

2

 

15

XF-LBI

2

 

Reverse Kilian 

16 

RFI 

2

 

 

 

 

 

STAR 5a

Willow Waltz

The skater will perform the pattern dance of the Willow Waltz solo, shadowed or partnered by a coach or PA. Approved music must be used from either the Skate Canada Dance Series Music or the Skate Canada Contemporary Dance Music List.

A maximum of 7 introductory steps may be used by the skater to build speed and flow to reach Step #1 of the dance. To ensure your skater is reaching step #1 at the correct time in the music, count the waltz beats (1,2,3,4,5,6). The 1st step of the dance must fall on the “downbeat” also known as the “strong” beat of the music. When you are counting, this beat will be count #1.

 

The skater must perform a minimum of 2 complete dance patterns.

 

Please note: Skaters may perform the male or female steps, regardless of gender. If a skater would like to be assessed performing each set of steps, this would be considered 2 separate tests (1 for each step pattern).

 

Optional Steps: #6 (for female) or #19 (for male) may be skated as a slide chasse.

 

 

 

Focus Area #1: Male Steps 8, 9 10 & 11, Female Step 8

Male: BO step to FO step executed with neat feet by bringing feet together on the transition. Skater should demonstrate proper progression technique with blade pushes.

Female: Skater should demonstrate good technique on the 3-turn with neat feet. Upright carriage of the body should be evident on the turn.

Focus Area #2: Male Step 14, Female Steps 15, 16, 17 & 18

Male: Skater should demonstrate good technique on the 3-turn with neat feet. Upright carriage of the body should be evident on the turn.

Female: Skater should demonstrate strong blade pushes throughout this section. Step 17 is not a progressive and should therefore be performed with the feet starting side by side and the free leg extending back with external rotation.

 

Focus Area #3: Male Steps 15, 16, 17 & 18, Female Steps 20, 21 & 22

Male: Skater should demonstrate strong pushing technique throughout this section with solid knee bend and lean. Skater may rise up to step forward on step #18 with neat feet.

Female: Skater should demonstrate solid progressive technique with solid lean and free leg extension to the front.

The skater must have 100% accuracy to receive credit for these areas.

 

A min 2 out of 3 successful Focus Areas are needed to pass the dance. 

 

Full Pattern: Timing*

Skaters are expected to demonstrate a good understanding of timing throughout the dance.

Minimum of:

-          75% of the dance on correct timing

 

Full Pattern: Carriage

Skaters are expected to carry themselves with good posture. The body and head should strive to be tall and extended with soft knees and good free leg extension.

-          Reasonable body carriage and extension for level

-          Reasonable depth of edges, control for the majority of the dance

 

Full Pattern: Technique*

Skaters are expected to demonstrate proper blade pushes and proper steps with a solid knee action.

-          75% of correct steps

-          75 % blade pushes

-          Some knee action evident throughout

 

 

STAR 5a – Willow Waltz Pattern Dance

 

Suggested Introductory Steps:

Man: RFO (3), LFO (2), chasse RFI, steps 20 to 22
Woman: RFO (3), LFO (3), steps 20 to 22

(Woman on man’s right)

 

Erect carriage and waltz rhythm should be maintained throughout the dance. If partnered, partners should skate close together and strive for neat footwork. Good flow and pace are desirable and should be strived for without obvious effort and visible pushing.

Music

Tempo

Pattern

·         Waltz 3/4

·         46 measures of 4 beats

·         138 beats per minute

 

·         Set

Inventor

First Performed

George Muller

Crystal Ice Palace, Willow Springs (Chicago) - 1953

 

 

 

Hold (optional)

Step No.

Male Steps

# of beats

Female Steps

Closed 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RFO 

LBO

 

 

LFI-Ch 

RBI-Ch

 

 

RFO 

LBO

 

 

LFO 

RBO

 

5

 

RFI

*LFO

 

 

 

OpMo

 

 

 

 6 

 

 LBI 

* RFI 

 

 7 

 

RBO  

 LFO

 

 8 

Focus Area #1

LBO  

3, 2 + 1

 RFO3

Focus Area #1

 9 

 RFO 

LBO 

 

10 

LFI-Pr 

RBI-Pr

 

11 

RFO

LBO

 

12 

 

LFO

RBO

 

13

 

 RFI-Ch 

LBI-Ch

 

14 

Focus Area #2

LFO3 

2 + 1, 3 

RBO

 

15 

Focus Area #3

RBO 

LFO

Focus Area #2

16 

LBO 

RFO

17 

RBI 

LFI

18

*LFO

RFI

 

 

 

 

OpMo

 

19 

 

*RFI 

LBI

 

20 

 

LFO 

RBO

Focus Area #3

21 

 

RFI-Pr 

LBI-Pr

22 

 

LFO 

RBO

*LFO, RFI progressive step optionally a slide chasse

Tips for partnering and execution:

The Willow Waltz is skated in closed hold throughout.

Steps 1 and 2 are chasse steps for both partners.

Steps 5 and 6 for the man form an inside open mohawk with a three-beat RFI leading into it and a three-beat LBI leading out.

Step 6 for the woman (and step 19 for the man) may be skated, optionally, as a slide chasse, in which case the free foot slides off the ice in front of the skater to match the partner's free leg at this step.The woman's step 8 is a three turned on a beat three.

Steps 9, 10 and 11 form a progressive sequence for both partners and are followed by a chasse sequence, steps 12 and 13.

The man's step 14 is a three turned on beat three; (NOTE: not a European Waltz type of three as it is not a cross roll take-off).

Steps 18 and 19 form an inside open mohawk for the woman with each step held for three beats. Step 19 for the man may be skated optionally as a slide chasse.

Steps 20, 21 and 22 are a progressive sequence for both partners

 

 


 

 

 

 

STAR 5b

LFO Open MoHawk

 

The LFO open Mohawk is executed on a LFO edge with full extension of the free foot held behind the skater. The skater will then bring the heel of the free foot to the instep of the skating foot before transferring the weight onto a RBO edge with the left free leg then staying close to the skating leg in preparation for the next step which would be a LBI edge. The timing for this Mohawk is 1 beat on the LFO edge and 1 beat on the RBO edge.

Only 1 required.

Minimum of:

- 100% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes or more

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

FO Double Knee Bend

 

A FO double knee bend initiates on a FO edge that is created by a blade push with the free leg fully extending behind the skater at an approximately 30-degree angle. The skating knee at the beginning of the edge is bent and held for 1 count before it rises for 1 count and then returns to a bent position for 2 additional counts. The edge is 4 counts in total (1+1+2).

Must do one on each foot:

Minimum of:

- 100% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes or more

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

Forward Progressive/Swing Roll Sequence

 

The skater may gain speed before commencing this sequence. Start the sequence with a LFO Pr exiting on a LFO edge (LFO –RFI Pr, LFO edge) with a timing count of 1+1+2. The skater will then bring their feet together before performing a RFO SwR with the free foot behind for 2 counts on a bent skating knee and then rise up as the free foot passes to the front and hold for 2 counts (2+2). Repeat this sequence.

Minimum of 2 sequences rolls must be performed per foot

Minimum of:

- 100% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes or more

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

Backward Progressive/Swing Roll Sequence

 

The skater may gain speed before commencing this sequence. Start the sequence with a RBO Pr exiting on a RBO edge (RBO-LBI Pr + RBO edge) with a timing count of 1+1+2. The skater will then bring their feet together before performing a LBO SwR with the free foot in front for 2 counts on a bent skating knee and then rise up as the free foot passes to the back and hold for 2 counts (2+2). Repeat this sequence.

Minimum of 2 sequences rolls must be performed per foot

Minimum of:

- 100% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes or more

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

Ten Fox Progressive

 

A Ten Fox progressive is performed exactly like forward progressives with the exception of the upper body position. For this progressive the upper body will be externally rotated to face outside of the circle with the left arm in front and the right arm behind. This progressive is only performed CCW (LFO – RFI Pr).

 

To introduce this skill to the skater, the skater will perform this skill on a circle the approx. size of a hockey circle.

Skater to perform a minimum of ½ of the circle with this element.

Minimum of:

- 100% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes or more

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

LFO Cross Behind

 

The LFO cross behind step is initiated by a LFO edge with the free leg fully extended behind the skater. The right foot then draws toward the skating foot to cross behind (inside the lobe) to step on a RFI edge. The left free foot then extends to the front before coming back beside the skating foot in preparation for a LFO edge (neat feet).

Only 1 required.

Minimum of:

- 100% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes or more

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

FO Cross Rolls

 

FO cross rolls can be initiated from either a RFO or LFO edge.  The free foot is extended behind the skater and internally rotates as it crosses the path of the skating foot to step on an outside edge.  To ensure the proper edge is achieved, the free foot may cross in front at a right angle to the skating foot. Once the weight is transferred to the other foot, the free leg is extended again and repeats the same action, thus creating a rolling feeling from one edge to the other.

Must do a sequence of 4 rolls (2 on each foot)

Minimum of:

- 100% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes or more

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

FO Cross Roll/3-Turn

 

The FO cross roll 3-turn is executed by a FO edge on either foot with the free leg extended behind the skater. The free foot is extended behind the skater and internally rotates as it crosses the path of the skating foot to step on an outside edge.  The skater will rise up on the skating knee as they bring their free foot to the skating foot while performing the 3-turn. The feet will remain close together as the skater transfers their weight to the BO edge of the free foot. Once the weight is transferred the free foot will then fully extend forward.  The skater will perform both FO 3-turns (LFO 3-turn, RBO edge + RFO 3-turn, LFO edge).

 

Skater must perform one 3-turn on each foot

Minimum of:

- 100% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes or more

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

BO Rolls

(insert pic)

 A roll is a term used to describe an edge. Backward rolls can be initiated on either foot and start with a BO edge with the free leg extended fully in front. As the skater prepares for the next roll they will draw their free foot towards their skating foot and step closely beside it onto the new edge. During these rolls the skating knee will remain bent.

 

For proper technique execution, ensure the free foot does not pass the skating foot.

Must do a sequence of 4 rolls (2 on each foot)

 Minimum of:

- 100% of steps must be correct

- 75% blade pushes or more

- 75% of steps must have reasonable balance and control

- Body carriage and line should be reasonable for this level

 Content & Training - DANCE

 

The following has been compiled to give coaches some resources and rationale for skill placement and training strategies in each discipline. Please note that all skills regardless of discipline can be trained on any session. It is not mandatory to segregate disciplines into different sessions. For easy training accessibility, it is recommended to allow skaters to train all areas of the STAR 1-5 program on the same session.

 

DANCE

 

STAR 1 DANCE –

Elements, is designed to be acquired within 6- 12 months of achieving skills in Stage 6 of CanSkate. This is a longer timeline than SKILLS or FREESKATE. The rationale for this is due to the intricacy needed to perform dance steps properly. Skaters will need time developing basic figure skating skills before having the coordination necessary to perform dance steps with good quality.  The success of this goal will largely depend on the quality of skills taught in Stage 5 & 6 as well as the program delivery and frequency in the club’s STAR 1-2 program.

STAR 1 Dance introduces the skaters to all of the dance steps required to be performed in the pattern dances at STAR 2 & 3.

 

NOTE: There is no mandatory criteria required for assessment at STAR 1 as it is “developmental”. As the entry level, skaters will be encouraged to achieve proper technique. The allowance of “no mandatory criteria” has been identified as skaters will repeat all of these skills in subsequent levels, therefore continuing their development. Coaches are encouraged to include these skills in every day routines, for example: Edge & Turn classes, Warm Up routines, or review before skating the pattern dances, etc. Reaching the GOLD standard of performance whenever possible, is the goal of the STAR 1-5 program.

STAR 1 DANCE - Elements

Rationale/progression:

Strategies to train this skill include:

Forward Progressives

The forward progressive is performed in almost every pattern dance. Coaches will have the opportunity to teach skaters the difference between a crosscut and a progressive and highlight the importance of blade pushes.  Coaches are also encouraged to focus on the continuous lean needed throughout the progressive motion.

-          training on a circle, coaches could introduce different timing to the steps with different tempos/rhythms of music or clapping.

-          Placing many skaters on the same circle to practice this skill at the same time. Coaches can reverse direction for the other way or implement a figure 8 pattern

-          Including these steps into edge/turn, power or dance step classes

-          Incorporating these steps into a circuit.

Forward Chasses

The forward chasse is a progression for the upcoming forward slide chasse. Coaches are encouraged to work on soft knees, extension and continuous lean. 

Forward Slide Chasses

The slide chasse is a fun step for the skaters to practice and will prepare them for the Canasta Tango. Coaches are encouraged to focus on extension of the free foot, both behind and in front, as well as soft knees and continuous lean.

Forward Outside Swing Roll Sequence

For this skill, coaches will have an opportunity to highlight the difference between an edge and a swing roll, by focusing on the rise of the skating knee as well as the extension of the free leg.

-          Incorporating this skill into edge/turn, power or dance step classes

-          Adding power, lean and coverage as the skater progresses in acquisition

-          Incorporating these steps into a circuit

Forward Outside Cross Rolls

The skaters will need to learn this step in preparation for the Baby Blues.  Coaches will have the opportunity to once again highlight the technique of blade pushing, while introducing a new concept of pushing from an outside edge onto an outside edge.

-          Incorporating this skill into edge/turn, power or dance step classes

-          Incorporating these steps into a circuit

-          Using a marker to draw the pattern on the ice, highlighting the changing of lobes

 

STAR 2 DANCE-

 consists of 2 pattern dances that can be assessed in any order.

NOTE: For every skill, one criteria has been identified as “mandatory”. Coaches need to be familiar with this mandatory criterion as it is necessary to be achieved to reach an overall passing rating for each skill. Be mindful that not all skills need to achieve this rating to pass the entire assessment.

 

Rationale/progression:

Strategies to train this skill include:

STAR 2a DANCE –

Dutch Waltz

 

 

STAR 2b DANCE – Canasta Tango

As the first set of pattern dances, coaches are encouraged to train the skater to solo or shadow these dances. This will allow the skater to develop the power and technique necessary for good quality execution.

 

Learning and memorizing a series of steps to music is a new skill for most skaters. Having a repertoire of dance steps learned in STAR 1 will be very beneficial as coaches piece the full pattern together.

 

Remember to explore the different songs available to perform the pattern dances, as this may help engage the skater’s interest.  Coaches will have the opportunity to educate the skaters on the different emotions or styles the dance steps are performed in when moving from rhythm to rhythm

-          Teaching each Focus Area in isolation to the skaters before implementing the pattern. This will encourage the constant focus on the technical aspects highlighted in each Focus Area.

-          Breaking up the dance into sections before introducing the entire pattern

-          Incorporating the steps into a class format (lanes) using waltz or tango music to introduce skaters to the new timing

 

 

 

STAR 3 DANCE:

 consists of one pattern dance and a series of elements containing the new dance steps found in the next set of pattern dances.

 

Rationale/progression:

Strategies to train this skill include:

STAR 3a DANCE – Baby Blues

The Baby Blues explores a new rhythm and reinforces the proper technique of a progressive with new timing. Coaches are encouraged to train the skaters to be able to perform this dance in either solo or shadow form.  Soft knees are key to the blues style of dance and should be a focus throughout this dance.

 

Remember to explore the different songs available to perform the pattern dances, as this may help engage the skater’s interest. 

-          Teaching each Focus Area in isolation to the skaters before implementing the pattern. This will encourage the constant focus on the technical aspects highlighted in each Focus Area.

-          Breaking up the dance into sections before introducing the entire pattern

-          Incorporating the steps into a class format (lanes) using blues music to introduce skaters to the new timing

STAR 3b DANCE - Elements

Backward Progressives

This skill requires skaters to learn a new pushing technique from a backward thrust. Coaches are also encouraged to focus on the continuous lean needed throughout the progressive motion.

This skill will be needed to perform many pattern dances including the Swing Dance in STAR 4 and the Willow Waltz in STAR 5.

-          Training on a circle, coaches could introduce different timing to the steps with different tempos/rhythms of music or clapping.

-          Placing many skaters on the same circle to practice this skill at the same time. Coaches can reverse direction for the other way or implement a figure 8 pattern

-          Including these steps into edge/turn, power or dance step classes

-          Incorporating these steps into a circuit.

Backward Chasses

A direct progression from forward chasses, backward chasses will continue to add to the skater’s development as they progress. Coaches will have an opportunity to work extension, lean and body alignment as the skaters go through these skills.

Backward Swing Roll Sequence

For this skill, coaches will have an opportunity to highlight the difference between an edge and a swing roll, by focusing on the rise of the skating knee as well as the extension of the free leg.

-          Incorporating this skill into edge/turn, power or dance step classes

-          Adding power, lean and coverage as the skater progresses in acquisition

-          Incorporating these steps into a circuit

Forward Inside Open Mohawks

To prepare skaters for the next three pattern dances, skaters will be introduced to the dance technique of Mohawk performance with two different free leg exit positions. The technique learned here, will continue to be required and developed throughout the remainder of the pattern dances.

Coaches will have the opportunity to educate the skaters on “wide stepping” and the importance of neat feet.

-          Training on a curve to reinforce edge quality

-          Including these steps into edge/turn or dance step class

-          Incorporating these steps into a circuit

-          For balanced development, coaches may consider teaching on the opposite foot

LFO Cross Roll, Cross Behind

As presented in the Fiesta Tango, skaters will be introduced to this step combination to begin the acquisition phase of development. Coaches will have the opportunity to focus on the technique, edge quality and free leg placement.

-          Using a marker to draw the pattern on the ice, highlighting the changing of lobes

-          Including these steps into edge/turn or dance step class

-          Incorporating these steps into a circuit

-          For balanced development, coaches may consider teaching on the opposite foot

FO 3-turn/BO edge

In preparation for the 3-turns required in the Willow Waltz, skaters will be introduced to the technique required for both the female and male steps. The technique learned here, will continue to be required and developed throughout the remainder of the pattern dances.

Coaches will have the opportunity to educate the skaters on “wide stepping” and the importance of neat feet.

-          Training on a curve to reinforce edge quality

-          Using a marker to draw the pattern on the ice

-          Including these steps into edge/turn or dance step class

-          Incorporating these steps into a circuit

 

STAR 4 DANCE:

 consists of 2 pattern dances that can be assessed in any order.

NOTE: For every skill, one criteria has been identified as “mandatory”. Coaches need to be familiar with this mandatory criterion as it is necessary to be achieved to reach an overall passing rating for each skill. Be mindful that not all skills need to achieve this rating to pass the entire assessment.

STAR 4

Rationale/progression:

Strategies to train this skill include:

STAR 4a DANCE –

Swing Dance

 

 

STAR 4b DANCE –

Fiesta Tango

For the second set of pattern dances, coaches are encouraged to train the skater to solo or shadow these dances. This will allow the skater to develop the power and technique necessary for good quality execution.

 

Remember to explore the different songs available to perform the pattern dances, as this may help engage the skater’s interest. 

 

Coaches will have the opportunity to educate the skaters on the different emotions or styles the dance steps are performed in when moving from rhythm to rhythm

-          Teaching each Focus Area in isolation to the skaters before implementing the pattern. This will encourage the constant focus on the technical aspects highlighted in each Focus Area.

-          Breaking up the dance into sections before introducing the entire pattern

-          Incorporating the steps into a class format (lanes) using different rhythms

 

 

 

STAR 5 DANCE:

 consists of one pattern dance and a series of elements containing the new dance steps found in the next set of pattern dances.

STAR 5

Rationale/progression:

Strategies to train this skill include:

STAR 5a DANCE –

Willow Waltz

The Willow Waltz is the first dance that has a different set of steps for the female and male.

 

Remember to explore the different songs available to perform the pattern dances, as this may help engage the skater’s interest. 

-          Teaching each Focus Area in isolation to the skaters before implementing the pattern. This will encourage the constant focus on the technical aspects highlighted in each Focus Area.

-          Breaking up the dance into sections before introducing the entire pattern

-          Incorporating the steps into a class format (lanes) using blues music to introduce skaters to the new timing

STAR 5b DANCE – Elements

LFO Open Mohawk

To prepare skaters for the new mohawk technique required for the Ten Fox, this skill will allow coaches to continue the development of neat feet while working a mohawk on outside edges.

-          Training on a curve to reinforce edge quality

-          Including these steps into edge/turn or dance step class

-          For balanced development, coaches may consider teaching on the opposite foot

FO Double Knee Bend

This skill allows coaches to focus on free leg extension, strong posture as well as depth of edge. The acquisition of this skill will prepare skaters for the Ten Fox pattern dance.

-          Incorporating this skill into edge/turn, power or dance step classes

-          Adding power, lean and coverage as the skater progresses in acquisition

Fwd Progressive/Swing Roll Sequence

In preparation for both the female and males steps of the Fourteen Step, skaters will be introduced to this step sequence. Coaches will be able to continue the development of both the progressive and swing roll technique, as well as introduce power and new timing.

-          Incorporating this skill into edge/turn, power or dance step classes

-          Adding power, lean and coverage as the skater progresses in acquisition

-          Using music as a tool to assist with timing

Bwd Progressive/Swing Roll Sequence

Ten Fox Progressive

To prepare skaters for the new body position required for the Ten Fox, this skill will allow coaches to continue the development of neat feet and the progressive technique.

-          Training on a curve to reinforce edge quality

 

LFO X-behind

This skill is required for the Fourteen Step. Coaches will be able to focus the skater’s attention on neat feet and soft knees throughout this skill.

-          Training on a curve to reinforce edge quality

-          Including these steps into edge/turn or dance step class

-          For balanced development, coaches may consider teaching on the opposite foot

FO X-rolls

Building on the FO x-roll technique previously learned, skaters be able to continue their development by focusing on larger lobes and execution on both feet.  Coaches will have the opportunity to reinforce proper blade push technique as well as strong posture. 

-          Incorporating this skill into edge/turn, power or dance step classes

-          Adding power, lean and coverage as the skater progresses in acquisition

-          Using music as a tool to assist with timing

 

Descriptions and Standards - FREESKATE

 

 

Criteria

Advance Stage of Development

Moderate Stage of Development

Early Stage of Development

Rotation:

Revolutions completed in the air

·      Able to complete full rotation of jump in the air

·         Able to complete jump with up to 1/4 rotation lacking

·     Unable to complete rotation in air

Execution (Jump):

Jump flight qualities

·      Jump height exceeds expectation relative to skater composition

·      Jump distance exceeds expectation relative to skater composition

·       Correct air position

·         Jump height meets expectation relative to skater composition

·         Jump distance meets expectation relative to skater composition

·     Jump height below expectation relative to skater composition

·     Jump distance below expectation relative to skater composition

·     Incorrect air position

Landing:

Length of edge, form

·  Upright posture maintained

·      Fully extended free leg

·      Deep knee bend in landing leg

·         Slight break in upright posture

·         Partial extension of free leg

·         Slight knee bend in landing leg

·     Significant break in posture

·     Lack of free leg extension

·     No knee bend in landing leg

Position:

Quality of position in spin

·      Solid posture maintained * Full free leg extension

·     Slight break in posture

·     Partial free leg extension

· Significant break in posture

·   No free leg extension

Edge Quality:

Ability to spin on prescribed edge

·      Able to maintain proper edge on spinning foot for more than 2 revs

 

·     Able to maintain proper edge on spinning foot for two revs or more

·     Able to maintain proper edge on spinning foot for less than 2 revs

Execution (Spin):

Established center, speed of revolutions, completion

·         Fast speed of rotation maintained or accelerated during spin

·         Control on exit

·     Moderate speed of rotation maintained during spin

·     Slight loss of control on exit

·     Slow speed of rotation or loss of speed during spin

·     Full loss of control on exit

Program Components (PC)

 

 

 

Skating Skills - Technique:

Proper mechanics demonstrated

·    Pushes from side of blade

·      Equal thrust on both feet in crosscuts

·    Correct knee action

·      Generally, pushes from side of blade

·      One dominant thrust may be evident

·     Some knee bend evident

·     Thrust technique not properly executed

 

·     Little knee bend – stroking choppy

·     Some toe-pushing may be evident

Skating Skills - Power:

The ability to generate and maintain speed

·     Demonstrates ability to accelerate and maintain speed

·     Demonstrates reasonable maintenance of speed

·     Skater seems slow

·     Unable to generate and maintain speed

·     Movements may seem laboured

Skating Skills - Execution:

Balance, control and edge quality

·    Skates on true edges

·    Strong body lean demonstrated

·    Skater has consistent balance

·     Edges of moderate quality

·     Some body lean demonstrated

·     Generally balanced

·     Weak edges and wobbles

·      Little to no body lean demonstrated

·     Balance inconsistent or weak

Performance - Carriage:

Style, form, line

·    The skater has comfortable upright carriage and good form

·    Demonstrates strong core 

·    Body positions are generally pleasing

·     The skater has reasonable form and generally upright carriage

·     Moderate core strength

·     Body positions have moderate extension

·     Form weak with weaknesses observed in carriage

·     Skater lacks core strength

·     Body positions are not fully extended

Performance - Projection:

The ability to perform with confidence

·    The skater is committed to all movements

·     The skater appears confident during the performance

·     The skater’s level of commitment to the movements varies during the performance

·     The skater’s level of confidence is moderate

·     The skater lacks commitment to the movements

·     The skater’s focus is down toward the ice

·     The skater appears apprehensive or unsure during the performance

Transition – Quality:

Ability to perform connecting steps with ease and flow

·    Generated speed and flow in program and is able to move freely from one element to another

·     Easily maintains speed in program and is able to move freely from one element to another

·     Program is lacking speed and movement between elements is laboured

Transition – Difficulty:

Construction of transitions within program

 

·    Skater demonstrates a variety of turns and steps to link movements.

·     Is able to perform simple turns and steps to link elements.

·     Program is constructed with mostly crosscuts between elements

*For FULL details of the continuums of development and the program components, please see the STAR 1-4 Judges Manual in the Resource Tool Kit.

NOTE: When training skaters for assessment at STAR 2 & above, there are some “non-negotiable” errors that will result in an automatic BRONZE rating. They are:

 

JUMPS:

  • Incorrect take off edge
  • Fall, 2-foot landing or step out

 

SPINS:

  • Proper edge not achieved for a minimum of 1 rev
  • Center not established
  • Fall

Reminder: All spins must have a minimum of 3 revolutions per foot to be accredited as a spin.

FREESKATE

Skill

Description

Minimum Performance Standard

STAR 1

Please note: The jumps and spins below may be performed in clockwise or counter clockwise rotation. For tips on how to determine the natural spinning direction for your skaters, please see TEACHING TIPS in the Resource Tool Kit.

 

Waltz jump

(1W)

 

Starting from backwards crosscuts, the skater will prepare for their waltz jump with a BO edge set up. Stepping forward onto a FO take off edge, the skater will pull arms back and then move them forward in conjunction with the free leg for take-off. The take-off foot will apply pressure to the ice through the toe to produce a launch and rotate in a natural direction according to the circle (like a 3-turn). The skater should hit an air position that is controlled, stable and extended. The skater will land on a BO edge on the opposite foot of take-off. The landing position should include the head up with eye focus parallel to ice, a strong body core with good posture and a free leg extension that sees the free toe externally rotated.

 

Please note: Skaters at this level are expected to prepare for their jumps from skating. Standstill starts are not acceptable for the assessment.

 

Rotation: Clean

(ISU definition of lacking ¼ rotation or less)

 

Reasonable height, distance and air position (for level)

 

Landing: Reasonable form (for level) and held for 1 second or more

Single Salchow jump

(1S)

 

Starting from backwards crosscuts, the skater will prepare for their salchow jump from a BO set up. Stepping forwards onto a FO edge the skater will execute a 3-turn with a BI edge that matches the FO edge in control and length. The skater will then apply pressure to the skating edge while allowing the upper body to rotate externally to create a pivot for launch. The free side will move forward in a natural direction to the circle (like a 3-turn) during the preparation to coincide with the take-off. The skater then achieves an extended air position to rotate to a BO edge landing on the opposite foot of take-off.

 

Additional entries include A mohawk may be used for preparation instead of a 3-Turn.

 

Please note: Skaters at this level are expected to prepare for their jumps from skating. Standstill starts are not acceptable for the assessment.

 

Single Toe Loop jump

(1T)

 

Starting from forwards skating, the skater will prepare for the toe loop by stepping onto a FI edge on their landing leg to execute a 3-turn in a controlled and equal manner. The free foot will extend behind the skater to place the toe into the ice before drawing the skating leg towards the toe on an backward outside edge. The skating foot performing the BO edge will continue backwards until it lifts off the ice as it passes the toe. Once the weight is transferred to the take-off toe in the ice the free foot continues to rotate in a natural direction until the body has rotated 1 full rotation to land on a BO edge.

 

 Additional entries include A mohawkstep BO, or FO 3-turnstep BO edge

 

Please note: Skaters at this level are expected to prepare for their jumps from skating. Standstill starts are not acceptable for the assessment.

 

 

 Rotation: Clean

 (ISU definition of lacking ¼ rotation or less)

NOTE: if take off is forward this is considered “lacking ½ rotation” thus downgrading the jump, even if the landing is backwards.

 

Reasonable height, distance and air position (for level)

 

Landing: Reasonable form (for level) and held for 1 second or more

Forward Upright Spin

(USp)

 

From backward crosscuts skaters will execute a BI edge preparation, allowing the upper body to rotate outside of the circle and the free leg extended. The skater will then step on a FO entry edge that will spiral to a FO 3-Turn. During the spiralling edge the skater’s free-side starts from behind and rotates forward to coincide with the 3-turn, creating a “forward arrest motion” as the skating side stops and the free-side initiates the spin. The skater will then center their balance over a BI edge in an “open” position before pulling their arms into their body (bending their elbows 1st), and bringing their free foot towards the skating leg (free foot between ankle and knee).  Skaters will exit by stepping onto a BO edge with their free foot.

 

Additional entries include:  FI 3-Turn to step onto the FO spiralling edge.

 

Please note: Skaters at this level are expected to prepare for their spins from skating. Standstill starts are not acceptable for the assessment.

 

 

Position: Reasonable body line (for level) and basic position held for 2 revs or more

 

Edge Quality: ½ rev performed on proper edge

 

Execution:  50% or more of spin centered with reasonable speed and exit (for level).

*BUSp must exit on spinning foot

Backward Upright Spin

(BUSp)

 

This spin starts with a FI spiralling edge with the free-side extended behind. The skater will perform a FI 3-turn, creating a “forward arrest motion”, as the free-side rotates outside of the circle to initiate the spinning action. Once the skating foot performs the 3-turn, the free-side then holds its position as the skating side rotates (or snaps) to a BO edge. The skater will then center their balance over a BO edge in an “open” position before pulling their arms into their body (bending their elbows 1st), and bringing their free foot towards the skating leg in an “air spin” position (ankles crossed).  Skaters will exit by opening the free leg positon toward the front, applying pressure to the BO edge and moving the free leg behind the skater to a landing positon.

 

Additional entries include: Starting from a standstill on 2 feet, transferring the weight onto the spinning leg using the snap of the hip and push off the free foot to create the spinning action.

 

Please note: For beginning skaters the main focus will be on the balance and control of this spin. The BO edge will continue to be developed as the skater gains more proficiency.  It is common for skaters at this level to achieve the BO edge when they “pull in” on the spin. As they progress through the STAR program the focus will move to achieving and maintaining the BO edge upon entry.

STAR 2 – ELEMENTS

Criteria with an asterisk (*) mandatory for a pass

1S

 

Same description as STAR 1. STAR 2 skaters will be expected to have more speed, height and control for this element.

Rotation:* Clean

(ISU definition of lacking ¼ rotation or less)

 

Reasonable height, speed, distance, air position and take-off edge(for level)

 

Landing: Reasonable form (for level) and held for 1 second or more

Single Loop

(1Lo)

 

Entering from backwards crosscuts the skater will establish a BO edge on their take-off foot with the free foot trailing in front but not weight bearing. The upper body will be rotated towards the centre of the circle. The skater will apply pressure to the BO edge thus initiating a spiralling edge. As the edge spirals towards the middle of the circle, the body will move as a unit in the direction of rotation, as the weight moves to the front of the skating foot and the free foot is lifted off the ice. When the weight reaches the toe pick, the skater will apply pressure downward to launch the jump and complete 1 full rotation. The skater will then land on the same foot as take-off on a BO edge.

 

Additional entries include: FO 3-turnstep BO edge, FI 3-Turn

 

Please note: Skaters at this level are expected to prepare for their jumps from skating. Standstill starts are not acceptable for the assessment.

Single Flip

(1F)

From a FO 3-turn executed on the opposite foot to their landing foot, the skater will reach a BI edge to prepare for take-off. On the BI edge the free leg will extend back with the free arm, as the skating side extends forward with the upper body rotated to the center of the circle. The skating leg bends to apply pressure into the ice. The free toe is then placed into the ice, allowing the skating side to pull towards the toe on a BI edge. As the weight is transferred to the free toe, the body will move as a unit in the direction of rotation. When the weight is fully on the toe pick, the skater will apply pressure downward to launch the jump and complete 1 full rotation. The skater will then land on the same foot as take-off on a BO edge.

 

Additional entries include: FI-FO change of edge to the 3-turn, FI Mohawk.

 

Please note: Skaters at this level are expected to prepare for their jumps from skating. Standstill starts are not acceptable for the assessment.

1W+1T+C

 

From backward crosscuts, the skater will perform a waltz jump with good power, speed and flow. Upon landing the skater will prepare for the toe loop by extending the free foot behind and free arm in front, thus creating a counter rotation, before placing the free toe in the ice to initiate the take-off for the toe loop.

 

Skaters will be expected to perform a proper take off on the toe loop by extending the BO edge to or passed the toe for take off.

 

Rotation:* Clean (for both jumps where applicable)

 (ISU definition of lacking ¼ rotation or less)

NOTE: If the take off is forward this is considered “lacking ½ rotation” thus downgrading the jump, even if the landing is backwards.

 

Reasonable height, speed, distance, air position and take-off edge (for level)

 

Landing: Reasonable form (for level) and held for 1 second or more

Forward Sit Spin

(SSp)

 

From backward crosscuts skaters will execute a BI edge preparation, allowing the upper body to rotate outside of the circle and the free leg extended. The skater will then step on a FO entry edge that will spiral to a FO 3-Turn. During the spiralling edge the skater’s free-side starts from behind and rotates forward in preparation for the “sit” position as the skating knee bends. Immediately after the 3-turn, the skater will complete the sit positon by bringing the free leg to the skating leg and lowering the body to achieve a position where the thigh of the skating leg is parallel with the ice.  Arms in the sit positon should be fully extended to the front of the body and held downward toward the free leg. The skaters will exit the spin by rising up and by stepping onto a BO edge with their free foot.

 

Additional entries include: FI 3-turn to step onto the FO spiralling edge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position:* Reasonable body line (for level) and basic position held for 2 revs or more (on each foot where applicable)

 

Edge Quality: 1 rev performed on proper edge

 

Execution:  50% or more of spin centered with reasonable speed and exit (for level).

 

Forward Camel Spin

(CSp)

 

From backward crosscuts skaters will execute a BI edge preparation, allowing the upper body to rotate outside of the circle and the free leg extended. The skater will then step on a FO entry edge with the upper body placed forward over the skating foot, in preparation for the camel position.  During the FO spiralling edge, the skater’s free side extends behind. The skating side arm reaches in front and rotates in the direction of travel to allow the free side to initiate the rotation when the skater performs the 3-turn. Immediately after the 3-turn, the skater will rise up on the skating leg, keeping the upper body forward to achieve a spiral position.  Arms in the camel positon should be extended to the sides of the body encouraging a slight arch of the back.  The skaters will exit the spin by rising up and by stepping onto a BO edge with their free foot.

 

Additional entries include: A FI 3-Turn to step onto the FO spiralling edge.

Change Foot Upright Spin

(CUSp)

 

Skaters will perform a forward upright spin for a minimum of 3 revolutions before transferring their weight to the opposite foot while maintaining their spin in the same direction to perform a backward upright for a minimum of 3 revolutions. 

 

The rationale for the minimum 3 revolutions is to coincide with the ISU’s definition of a spin. Spins with less than 3 revs are not given credit in the CPC system.

 

Please note: This spin must exit on the spinning foot.

 

STAR 2  - PROGRAM

 

Skaters will skate a program to music as per the requirements in the current technical package for STAR 2.

 

 

Must include the following jumps:

1S, 1T, 1Lo, 1F or 1Lz, 1W+1T+C

Must include the following spins:

BUSp, SSp or CSp (Forward entry)

Must include the following additional elements:

SpSq (Forward Spirals), TrSq (FO Turn Sequence from STAR 2 Skills)

 

 

 

All elements must be attempted in the program.

 

Skating Skills

At STAR 2, skaters should be at the entry level of the “Moderate Stage of Development” for a SILVER assessment:

-          Generally, pushes from the side of the blade

-          One dominant thrust may be evident

-          Some knee bend evident

-          Demonstrates reasonable maintenance of speed

-          Edges of moderate quality

-          Some body lean demonstrated

-          Generally balanced

Technique:* Reasonable (for level)

-          Turns and blade pushes for 75% of program

Acceleration & knee action

Generally stable, demonstrating some body lean

 

Performance

 

At STAR 2, skaters should be at the entry level of the “Moderate Stage of Development” for a SILVER assessment:

-          The skater has reasonable form and generally upright carriage

-          Moderate core strength

-          Body positions have moderate extension

-          The skater’s level of commitment to the movements varies during the performance

-          The skater’s level of confidence is moderate.

Carriage:* Reasonable (for level)

-          Form, core strength, body line

Confidence and commitment to movements

STAR 3 - ELEMENTS

1F

Same description as STAR 2. STAR 3 skaters will be expected to have more speed, height and control for this element.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rotation:* Clean (for both jumps where applicable)

(ISU definition of lacking ¼ rotation or less)

 

Reasonable height, speed, distance, air position and take-off edge(for level)

 

Landing: Reasonable form (for level) & held for 1 second or more

1Lz

 

From backward crosscuts, skaters will establish a BO edge on the opposite foot to their landing foot in an upright balanced position. To prepare for take-off, the skater will rotate their body in the opposite direction of rotation while extending their arms and free leg (skating side forward, free side behind). As the skater applies pressure to the BO edge, thus increasing the curve, the skater will reach their fully extended position before placing the free toe in the ice. Once the free toe is placed into the ice, the skating side will be pulled towards the toe on a BO edge. As the weight is transferred to the free toe, the body will move as a unit in the direction of rotation. When the weight is fully on the toe pick, the skater will apply pressure downward to launch the jump and complete 1 full rotation. The skater will then land on the same foot as take-off on a BO edge.

 

1W+1Lo+C

 

From backward crosscuts, the skater will perform a waltz jump with good power, speed and flow. Upon landing the skater will prepare for the loop by holding the free side in front in preparation for the loop take-off. The skater will then apply pressure to the BO edge, allowing the curve to increase. As the edge spirals towards the middle of the circle, the body will move as a unit in the direction of rotation, as the weight moves to the front of the skating foot. When the weight reaches the toe pick, the skater will apply pressure downward to launch the jump and complete 1 full rotation. The skater will then land on the same foot as take-off on a BO edge.

 

1Lo+1Lo+C

 

The skater will perform a loop as per the description in STAR 2 with more power, speed and flow. Upon landing the 1st loop jump, the skater will then prepare for the 2nd loop jump by holding the free side in front. The skater will then apply pressure to the BO edge, allowing the curve to increase. As the edge spirals towards the middle of the circle, the body will move as a unit in the direction of rotation, as the weight moves to the front of the skating foot. When the weight reaches the toe pick, the skater will apply pressure downward to launch the jump.

 

BUSp

 

As per the description in STAR 1 with more balance, rotations and better edge quality.

At this level, the FI spiralling edge is the required entry.

 

Please note: This spin must exit on the spinning foot.

 

Position:* Basic position held for 2 revs or more (on each foot where applicable)

 

Edge Quality: 2 revs performed on correct edge

 

Execution:  50% or more of spin centered with reasonable speed and exit (for level).

 

Backward Sit Spin

(SSp)

 

This spin starts with a FI spiralling edge with the free-side extended behind. The skater will perform a FI 3-turn, creating a “forward arrest motion”, as the free-side rotates outside of the circle to initiate the spinning action. Once the skating foot performs the 3-turn, the skating knee will bend to complete the sit positon by bringing the free leg to the skating leg and lowering the body to achieve a position where the thigh of the skating leg is parallel with the ice.  Arms in the sit positon should be fully extended to the front of the body and held downward toward the free leg.  Skaters will exit by rising up and opening the free leg positon toward the front, applying pressure to the BO edge and moving the free leg behind the skater to a landing positon.

 

Forward Camel/Sit Spin

(CoSp)

 

The skater will start the spin as per the description in STAR 2 for a camel spin. After a minimum of 2 revolutions in a camel position the skater will raise the upper body to a semi-upright position while bringing the free leg around to acquire a sit position as the arms come forward and the skating knee bends. The skater will rotate in the “sit” position for a minimum of 2 revolutions before exiting the spin.

STAR 3 - PROGRAM

 

Skaters will skate a program to music as per the requirements in the current technical package for STAR 3.

 

 

Must include the following jump content:

1W, 3 different single jumps (no axel), 1Lo+1Lo+C

Must include the following spin content:

BUSp, CoSp or CCoSp

Must include the following additional elements:

SpSq (Forward)

 

Skating Skills

At STAR 3, skaters should be at the exit level of the “Moderate Stage of Development” for a SILVER assessment:

-          Generally, pushes from the side of the blade

-          One dominant thrust may be evident

-          Some knee bend evident

-          Demonstrates reasonable maintenance of speed

-          Edges of moderate quality

-          Some body lean demonstrated

-          Generally balanced

 

 

Technique:* Reasonable (for level)

-          *Turns and blade pushes for 75% of program

 

Reasonable (for level) acceleration & knee action

 

Generally stable, demonstrating some body lean

 

Performance

 

At STAR 3, skaters should be at the exit level of the “Moderate Stage of Development” for a SILVER assessment:

-          The skater has reasonable form and generally upright carriage

-          Moderate core strength

-          Body positions have moderate extension

-          The skater’s level of commitment to the movements varies during the performance

-          The skater’s level of confidence is moderate.

Carriage:* Reasonable (for level)

-          *Form, core strength, body line

 

Reasonable (for level) confidence and commitment to movements

Interpretation

 

At STAR 3, skaters should be at the exit level of the “Moderate Stage of Development” for a SILVER assessment:

-          The skater may only demonstrate a connection to the pace of the music for brief moments

-          The skater demonstrates a small number of movements that match the timing of the music

-          The skater includes a small number of movements that relate to the character of the music.

Timing:* A few movements match musical pace/timing.

 

Very basic interpretation: limited understanding of music and its character.

STAR 4 - ELEMENTS

1Lz

 

Same description as STAR 3. STAR 4 skaters will be expected to have more speed, height and control for this element.

 

 

 

 

 

Rotation:* Clean (for both jumps where applicable)

 (ISU definition of lacking ¼ rotation or less)

NOTE: If the take off is forward this is considered “lacking ½ rotation” thus downgrading the jump, even if the landing is backwards.

 

Reasonable height, speed, distance, air position and take-off edge (for level)

 

Landing: Reasonable form (for level) & held for 1 second or more

Single Axel

(1A)

 

Starting from backwards crosscuts, the skater will prepare for their axel jump with a BO edge set up. Stepping forward onto a FO take off edge, the skater will pull arms back and then move them forward in conjunction with the free leg for take-off. The take-off foot will apply pressure to the ice through the toe to produce a launch and rotate in a natural direction according to the circle (like a 3-turn). As the free foot launches passed the take-off foot the weight will begin to transfer to the rotating axis of the skater (opposite side to take off side). The skater will complete 1.5 rotations to land on a BO edge on the opposite foot of take-off.

1F+1T+C

 

The skater will perform a flip jump with good power, speed and flow. Upon landing the skater will prepare for the toe loop by extending the free foot behind and free arm in front, thus creating a counter rotation, before placing the free toe in the ice to initiate the take-off for the toe loop.

 

Skaters will be expected to perform a proper take off on the toe loop by extending the BO edge to or passed the toe for take off.

 

 

1Lo+1Lo+C

Same description as STAR 3. STAR 4 skaters will be expected to have more speed, height and control for this element.

Backward camel spin

(CSp)

 

This spin starts with a FI spiralling edge with the free-side extended behind and upper body bent forward over the skating foot. The skater will perform a FI 3-turn, creating a “forward arrest motion”, as the free-side rotates outside of the circle to initiate the spinning action. Immediately after the 3-turn, the skater will rise up on the skating leg, keeping the upper body forward to achieve a spiral position.  Arms in the camel positon should be extended to the sides of the body encouraging a slight arch of the back.  Skaters will exit by rising up and applying pressure to the BO edge and moving the free leg behind the skater to a landing positon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Position:* Basic position held for 2 revs or more (on each foot where applicable)

 

Edge Quality: 2 revs performed on correct edge

 

Execution: 50% or more of spin centered with reasonable speed, exit and take off (FO) (for level).

 

Change foot sit spin

(CSSp)

 

Performing a sit spin as described in STAR 2, the skater will execute a minimum of 2 revolutions in a sit position before transferring their weight to the free foot, while spinning to execute a sit position on the opposite foot for a minimum of 2 revolutions.

 

The skater may perform this spin as a backward entry sit to a forward sit change spin.

Combination Spin or Change Combination Spin

(CoSp or CCoSp)

 

From a forward or backward entry, the skater must perform preform a camel and a sit for a minimum of 2 revolutions each somewhere in the spin. The upright position is also permitted but not mandatory. This spin may change feet if desired. If the spin does change feet, the skater must execute a “basic” position on the 2nd foot to receive credit for the change of foot.

Flying Camel or Flying Sit Spin

(FCSp or FSSp)

 

Flying Camel: The skater will enter the spin as per the description in STAR 2 for forward camel.  As the skater approaches the end of the edge that usually prepares for the 3-turn, the skater will apply pressure to the toe of the skating foot to launch into the air. The upper body will stay forward as the free leg swings around to become the landing foot and the take-off foot rises to a camel position. Upon landing on a BO edge, the skater will rise up on the skating leg, keeping the upper body forward to achieve a spiral position.  Arms in the camel positon should be extended to the sides of the body encouraging a slight arch of the back.  The skaters will exit on the spinning foot.

 

Flying Sit: The skater will enter the sit spin as per the description in STAR 2 for forward sit spin. The free leg starts behind the skater and swings around the body. As it approaches the ¼ mark, the skating knee starts to rise as pressure is applied to the FO edge in preparation for take-off. As the skater approaches the end of the edge that usually prepares for the 3-turn, the skater will apply pressure to the toe of the skating foot to launch into the air. In the air the skater will pull up the take-off leg to achieve a sit position (thigh parallel to the ice) in the air. The free leg is slightly wider in the air than would be required on the ice.

As the skater prepares to land the take-off leg will extend to the ice to prepare for landing on a BI edge. Once the skater has landed, they will immediately pull into a “sit” position bringing the free foot to the skating leg and drawing the arms forward and down towards the free leg. The skaters will exit on the spinning foot.

 

Additional entries include: A FI 3-Turn to step onto the FO spiralling edge.

STAR 4  - PROGRAM

 

Skaters will skate a program to music as per the requirements in the current technical package for STAR 4.

 

 

Must include the following jump content:

1A, 3 different singles (other than axel), 1Lo+1Lo+C

Must include the following spin content:

BUpSp, CoSp or CCoSp

Must include the following additional elements:

SpSq (Forward spirals)

 

Skaters must attempt an axel at this level.

Skating Skills

At STAR 4, skaters should be at the exit level of the “Moderate Stage of Development” for a SILVER assessment:

-          Generally, pushes from the side of the blade

-          One dominant thrust may be evident

-          Some knee bend evident

-          Demonstrates reasonable maintenance of speed

-          Edges of moderate quality

-          Some body lean demonstrated

-          Generally balanced

 

 

Technique:* Reasonable (for level)

-          *Turns and blade pushes for 75% of program

 

Reasonable (for level) acceleration & knee action

 

Generally stable, demonstrating some body lean

 

Performance

 

At STAR 4, skaters should be at the exit level of the “Moderate Stage of Development” for a SILVER assessment:

-          The skater has reasonable form and generally upright carriage

-          Moderate core strength

-          Body positions have moderate extension

-          The skater’s level of commitment to the movements varies during the performance

-          The skater’s level of confidence is moderate.

Carriage:* Reasonable (for level)

-          Form, core strength, body line

 

Reasonable (for level) confidence and commitment to movements

Interpretation

At STAR 4, skaters should be at the exit level of the “Moderate Stage of Development” for a SILVER assessment:

-          The skater may only demonstrate a connection to the pace of the music for brief moments

-          The skater demonstrates a small number of movements that match the timing of the music

-          The skater includes a small number of movements that relate to the character of the music.

Timing:* A few movements match musical pace/timing.

 

Very basic interpretation: limited understanding of music and its character.

STAR 5 - ELEMENTS

1A

 

As per the description in STAR 4 with more power, speed and height.

 

Any double jump

(2S, 2T, 2Lo, 2F, 2Lz)

Double Salchow: Starting from backwards crosscuts, the skater will prepare for their salchow jump from a BO set up. Stepping forwards onto a FO edge the skater will execute a 3-turn with a BI edge that matches the FO edge in control and length. The skater will then apply pressure to the skating edge while allowing the upper body to rotate externally to create a pivot for launch. The free side will move forward in a natural direction to the circle (like a 3-turn) during the preparation to coincide with the take-off.  As the free foot launches passed the take-off foot the weight will begin to transfer to the rotating axis of the skater (opposite side to take off side). The skater will complete 2 rotations to land on a BO edge on the opposite foot of take-off.

 

Additional entries include A mohawk may be used for preparation instead of a 3-Turn.

 

Double Toe Loop: Starting from forwards skating, the skater will prepare for the toe loop by stepping onto a FI edge on their landing leg to execute a 3-turn in a controlled and equal manner. The free foot will extend behind the skater to place the toe into the ice before drawing the skating leg towards the toe on an outside edge. The skating foot performing the BO edge will continue backwards until it lifts off the ice as it passes the toe. Once the weight is transferred to the take-off toe in the ice the free foot continues to rotate in a natural direction transferring the weight to the rotating axis of the skater (opposite side to take off side). The skater will complete 2 rotations to land on a BO edge on the opposite foot of take-off.

 

Additional entries include: A mohawkstep BO, or FO 3-turnstep BO edge may also be used for preparation.

 

Double Loop: Entering from backwards crosscuts the skater will establish a BO edge on their take-off foot with the free foot trailing in front but not weight bearing. The upper body will be rotated towards the centre of the circle. The skater will apply pressure to the BO edge thus initiating a spiralling edge. As the edge spirals towards the middle of the circle, the body will move as a unit in the direction of rotation, as the weight moves to the front of the skating foot and the free foot is lifted off the ice. When the weight reaches the toe pick, the skater will apply pressure downward to launch the jump and complete 2 full rotations by closing the rotating position in the air. The skater will then land on the same foot as take-off on a BO edge.

 

Additional entries include: FO 3-turnstep BO edge, FI 3-Turn

 

Double Flip: From a FO 3-turn executed on the opposite foot to their landing foot, the skater will reach a BI edge to prepare for take-off. On the BI edge the free leg will extend back with the free arm, as the skating side extends forward with the upper body rotated to the center of the circle. The skating leg bends to apply pressure into the ice. The free toe is then placed into the ice, allowing the skating side to pull towards the toe on a BI edge. As the weight is transferred to the free toe, the body will move as a unit in the direction of rotation. When the weight is fully on the toe pick, the skater will apply pressure downward to launch the jump and complete 2 full rotations by closing the rotating position in the air. The skater will then land on the same foot as take-off on a BO edge.

 

Additional entries include: FI-FO change of edge to the 3-turn, FI Mohawk.

 

Double Lutz: From backward crosscuts, skaters will establish a BO edge on the opposite foot to their landing foot in an upright balanced position. To prepare for take-off, the skater will rotate their body in the opposite direction of rotation while extending their arms and free leg (skating side forward, free side behind). As the skater applies pressure to the BO edge, thus increasing the curve, the skater will reach their fully extended position before placing the free toe in the ice. Once the free toe is placed into the ice, the skating side will be pulled towards the toe on a BO edge. As the weight is transferred to the free toe, the body will move as a unit in the direction of rotation. When the weight is fully on the toe pick, the skater will apply pressure downward to launch the jump and complete 2 full rotations by closing the rotating position in the air. The skater will then land on the same foot as take-off on a BO edge.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rotation*: Clean (for both jumps where applicable)

(ISU definition of lacking ¼ rotation or less)

 

Reasonable height, speed, distance, air position and take-off edge (for level)

 

Landing: Reasonable form (for level) and held for 1 second or more

 

1Lz+1T+C

 

The skater will perform a lutz jump with good power, speed and flow. Upon landing the skater will prepare for the toe loop by extending the free foot behind and free arm in front, thus creating a counter rotation, before placing the free toe in the ice to initiate the take-off for the toe loop.

 

SSp or CSp (Forward or Backward entry)

 

As per the descriptions in STAR 2, 3 & 4, the skater may choose to execute a sit or camel with either a forward or backward entry. This spin should be performed with more balance, control and speed of rotation than the previous levels with a strong basic position executed.

Position:* Basic position held for 2 revs or more (on each foot where applicable)

 

Edge Quality: 2 revs performed on proper edge

 

Execution:  50% or more of spin centered with reasonable speed, exit and take-off (FO) (for level).

 

Spin in 1 position with any variation

(UpSp, CSp, SSp)

 

The skater may choose a basic position spin and perform a variation of their choice for that basic position. The variation may be simple or difficult in nature. The spin may be forward or backward entry.

CoSp or CCoSp

 

Same description as STAR 4. STAR 5 skaters will be expected to have more balance, control and speed of rotation than the previous levels with a strong basic position executed.

FCSp or FSSp

 

Same description as STAR 4. STAR 5 skaters will be expected to have more balance, control and speed of rotation than the previous levels with a strong basic position executed.

STAR 5 – PROGRAM

 

Skaters will skate a program to music as per the requirements in the current technical package for STAR 5.

 

 

Must include the following jump content:

1A (must be landed), and 4 other jump elements (max 2 doubles, max 2 jump combos)

Must include the following spin content:

SSp or CS and CoSp or CCoSp

Must include the following additional elements:

SpSq (as per Technical Package)

Skaters will be required to land the 1A at < (under-rotated), or better.

 

Skating Skills

Skaters at the STAR 5 level should be in the “Advanced Stage of Development” for a SILVER assessment.

-          Pushes from the side of the blade

-          Equal thrust on both feet in crosscuts

-          Correct knee action

-          Demonstrates ability to accelerate and maintain speed

-          Skates on true edges

-          Strong body lean demonstrated

-          Skater has consistent balance

Technique:* Reasonable (for level)

-          Turns and blade pushes for 75% of program

-           

Reasonable (for level) acceleration & knee action

 

Generally stable, demonstrating some body lean

 

 

Performance

 

Skaters at the STAR 5 level should be in the “Advanced Stage of Development” for a SILVER assessment.

-          The skater has comfortable upright carriage and good form

-          Demonstrates strong core

-          Body positions are generally pleasing

-          The skater is committed to all movements

-          The skater appears confident during the performance

Carriage:* Reasonable (for level)

-          Form, core strength, body line

 

Reasonable (for level) confidence and commitment to movements

Interpretation

Skaters at the STAR 5 level should be in the “Advanced Stage of Development” for a SILVER assessment.

The skater matches his/her pace of the music

-          The skater matches his/her pace to the pace of the music

-          The skater demonstrates multiple movements that match the timing of the music

-          The skater includes multiple movements that relate to the character of the music

             

 

Timing:* A few movements match musical pace/timing.

 

Very basic interpretation: limited understanding of music and its character.

Transitions

Skaters at the STAR 5 level should be in the “Advanced Stage of Development” for a SILVER assessment.

Quality:* Reasonable ease of movement and maintenance of speed

 

Includes simple turns and steps to link elements together.

 

Content & Training - FREESKATE

 

The following has been compiled to give coaches some resources and rationale for skill placement and training strategies in each discipline. Please note that all skills regardless of discipline can be trained on any session. It is not mandatory to segregate disciplines into different sessions. For easy training accessibility, it is recommended to allow skaters to train all areas of the STAR 1-5 program on the same session.

 

FREESKATE

FREESKATE assessment is divided into 2 parts: Elements and Programs. Elements consist of jumps and spins only. Programs will directly correlate with the program criteria expected at the STAR 2-5 Events. In order to receive credit for a full STAR level rating both the Elements and the Program assessments must be obtained at the same level. 

  • For example: STAR 5 Freeskate Elements + STAR 5 Freeskate Program = STAR 5 Freeskate

Skaters do not have to pass a full level before moving to the next assessment.

  • For example: Skaters may choose to continue pursuing their Freeskate Element assessments without completing the Freeskate Program assessments for each level.

 

STAR 1 FREESKATE -

ELEMENTS are designed to be acquired within 3-9 months of achieving skills in Stage 6 of CanSkate. The success of this goal will largely depend on the quality of skills taught in Stage 5 & 6 as well as the program delivery and frequency in the club’s STAR 1-2 program. STAR 1 skills introduce skaters to basic philosophical foundations of quality skating. 

At this level, there is only an assessment for elements. Program assessment will start at STAR 2 to allow skaters time to acquire skills to put in the program.

NOTE: There is no mandatory criteria required for assessment at this level as it is “developmental”. As the entry level, skaters will be encouraged to achieve proper technique. The allowance of “no mandatory criteria” has been identified as skaters will repeat all of these skills in subsequent levels, therefore continuing their development. Coaches are encouraged to include skills at all the levels into the skaters regular training routines. This will help reinforce technique learned as well as challenge development.

STAR 1 Freeskate -ELEMENTS

Rationale/progression:

Strategies to train this skill include:

Waltz Jump

The waltz jump will become the foundation for the axel as skater’s progress. Ensuring proper take off technique, loading for power, air position stability and proper landing action will benefit the skater as they continue their jump acquisition.

-          Using the boards for stability as coaches teach the skaters the feeling of “rolling off the toe” for take off

-          Increasing speed as the skater’s comfort level increases

-          Can be trained on a circuit, in a small group or in an open class format

-          Exercises to reinforce and train proper landing position

-          Jumps can also be trained off the ice for control, position and launch mechanics

Single Salchow

The Salchow is a complex skill for this level. Coaches are encouraged to train a “checked” or controlled position on the BI edge entry before initiating take off sequence. This will be essential for multiple rotations later in development.

-          Training the entry, without adding the jump to ensure the skater learns control before take off.

-          Using the boards for stability as coaches teach the skaters the feeling of “rolling off the toe” for take off

-          Increasing speed and distance, as the skater’s comfort level increases

-          Can be trained on a circuit, in a small group or in an open class format

-          Exercises to reinforce and train proper landing position

-          Jumps can also be trained off the ice for control, position and launch mechanics

Single Toe Loop

The toe loop is an essential jump for development.  It is often used in jump combinations as the second jump later in development. Teaching the proper take off will allow skaters to prepare for their double toe loop, as well as ensure credit for full rotation when being used as part of a combination.  As with the Salchow, training a proper “check” or controlled position on the BO edge before placing the toe for take off is essential. Skaters will generally need lots of guidance and practice exercises to get comfortable with the new technique of weight transfer on the take off, as well as ensuring the BO edge is sustained to the take off point.

-          Stand still exercises allowing the skater to explore the BO edge length on take off while transferring the weight to the toe. The boards may be a good source of stability for this exercise.

-          Video examples of proper take offs for skater comprehension

-          Training the entry, without adding the jump to ensure the skater learns control before take off.

-          Increasing speed and distance, as the skater’s comfort level increases

-          Jumps can also be trained off the ice for control, position and launch mechanics

-          Can be trained on a circuit, in a small group or in an open class format

-          Exercises to reinforce and train proper landing position

Forward Upright Spin

As the next step in progression from the “1-foot spin with a spiralling edge” in CanSkate, the forward upright spin in STAR 1 will allow the coaches to focus on more technical aspects like:

-          Centering

-          Position

-          Edge quality (BI edge)

Train the skaters to know that each spin must be a minimum of 3 rotations (per foot) to qualify as a spin.

-          Exercises that explore edge awareness of spinning foot

-          Exercises that focus on proper centering. Skaters must learn how to establish a center.

-          Exercises that explore efficient and inefficient spinning positions to help them identify the proper positioning needed for a strong spin.

Backward Upright Spin

Other than the “alternating foot spin” in CanSkate, this is the first time skaters are exposed to a backward spin. The importance of this skill is paramount for the awareness of “air position” for jumps and spin acquisition for higher levels.  The most important features of the back spin at this level are:

-          Position

-          Centering

Skaters will develop edge quality awareness as they progress.

-          Training the positions of the back spin in isolation first. This can be done on a circle or straight line

-          Initiating spin from a standstill and graduating to a FI spiralling edge when ready. Assessment can be done with either entry.

-          Including this skill as part of a daily practice routine for all levels, with many repetitions.

-          Exercises to increase stability on rotating axis

STAR 2 FREESKATE - ELEMENTS

This level will see the introduction of some new skills, building on the concepts learned at STAR 1.

NOTE: For every skill, one criteria has been identified as “mandatory”. Coaches need to be familiar with this mandatory criterion as it is necessary to be achieved to reach an overall passing rating for each skill. Be mindful that not all skills need to “pass” to achieve a successful overall assessment.

STAR 2 Freeskate - ELEMENTS

Rationale/progression:

Strategies to train this skill include:

Single Salchow

The Salchow is repeated on STAR 2 to allow coaches to continue to develop the technique in readiness for double Salchow. The focus should be on developing more power, height, speed and distance at this level.

-          Encouraging skaters to use a larger curve/circle for preparation

-          Adding speed. Consider using power classes to increase speed awareness. Coaches can also pair more powerful skaters with less powerful skaters to encourage development while performing jumps side by side.

-          Increasing position and technique awareness. Coaches may also consider exposing the skaters to different preparation and entries.

-          Reinforcing proper landing position

Single Loop

This is the first appearance for this jump and first time skaters will be exposed to a jump taking off and landing on the same foot. Coaches will be able to relate the knowledge acquired in the back spin to the positions needed for the loop jump. This jump will be repeated many times in the STAR 1-5 program as, like the toe loop, it is often used in combinations as the second jump.

Setting up solid technique and control on this jump in STAR 2 will ease the development needed for jump combinations as well as multiple rotations (ex: double loop).

-          Using the back spin to reinforce rotating axis and landing alignment. Coaches can have the skater jump up and down while spinning to reinforce take off and landing on the same foot. The back spin can also be used as a launching ground for the loop by having the skater “jump out” of the spin

-          Exposing skaters to different preparation and entries into loop take off

-          Using the boards for stability as coaches teach the skaters the feeling of “rolling off the toe” for take off

-          Jumps can also be trained off the ice for control, position and launch mechanics

Single Flip

Coaches can use many of the same strategies for the flip as outlined in the loop above. Two key areas of focus during the development of this jump, is the control of the BI edge before take off and the weight transfer to the toe during take off.  Skaters will be introduced to a “pivoting” action on take off for the flip.

Setting up solid technique and control on this jump in STAR 2 will ease the development needed for multiple rotations (ex: double flip).

-          Using the back spin to reinforce rotating axis and landing alignment. Coaches can have the skater jump up and down while spinning to reinforce take off and landing on the same foot. The back spin can also be used as a launching ground for the loop by having the skater “jump out” of the spin

-          Exercises to expose skaters to weight transfer needed from BI edge to take off toe. This can be done without rotation first to build awareness.

-          Exercises for toe pivoting action required for take off

-          Jumps can also be trained off the ice for control, position and launch mechanics

Waltz + Single Toe Loop Combination

This is the first jump combination the skaters will be assessed on. The focus will be on equal flow for both jumps, as well as proper take off for the toe loop. Be mindful that a forward take off on the toe loop will result in a “downgrade” rating for rotation, leaving the skill at the Bronze rating.

-          Video work to show skaters their technique, performance and flow

-          Reinforcement of technique exercises. Ex: 1W + 1T +1T +1T to challenge skaters to find proper take off technique for the toe loop regardless of flow

-          Increasing speed and distance, as the skater’s comfort level increases

Sit Spin

(forward entry)

Building on the foundations set for the STAR 1 upright spin, coaches will be able to introduce the following concepts:

-          Definition of the correct sit position

-          2 revolution requirement to receive credit for the sit position

Learning these two concepts at this level, will allow skaters to focus on two key requirements as they develop this skill.

Keep in mind, skaters will need to perform 3 complete rotations in total for the spin to be assessed.

Focus will also be placed on proper spinning edge (BI edge) as skaters will be assessed on centering and edge quality.

-          Using off ice training to train core and leg strength needed to obtain position

-          Using field move classes to train 1-foot sit glides, forwards and backwards

-          Spin classes that challenge skaters to train different aspects of the spin in a fun way

-          Video work to show skater’s their position, as well as videos or in person examples of good positions.

-          Examining the print left on the ice after the spin to assess spinning circle size, edge and centering

Camel Spin

(forward entry)

Building on the foundations set for the STAR 1 upright spin, coaches will be able to introduce the following concepts:

-          Definition of the correct camel position

-          2 revolution requirement to receive credit for the camel position

Learning these two concepts at this level, will allow skaters to focus on two key requirements as they develop this skill.

Keep in mind, skaters will need to perform 3 complete rotations in total for the